Association between self-monitoring of blood glucose and diet among minority patients with diabetes

Lisa M. McAndrew, Carol R. Horowitz, Kristie J. Lancaster, Karen S. Quigley, Leonard M. Pogach, Pablo A. Mora, Howard Leventhal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is used to regulate glucose control. It is unknown whether SMBG can motivate adherence to dietary recommendations. We predicted that participants who used more SMBG would also report lower fat and greater fruit and vegetable consumption. Methods: The present study was a cross-sectional study of 401 primarily minority individuals living with diabetes in East Harlem, New York. Fat intake and fruit and vegetable consumption were measured with the Block Fruit/Vegetable/Fiber and Fat Screeners. Results: Greater frequency of SMBG was associated with lower fat intake (rs=-0.15; P<0.01), but not fruit and vegetable consumption. The effects of SMBG were not moderated by insulin use; thus, the relationship was significant for those individuals both on and not on insulin. A significant interaction was found between frequency of SMBG and changing one's diet in response to SMBG on total fat intake. The data suggest that participants who use SMBG to guide their diet do not have to monitor multiple times a day to benefit. Conclusion: The present study found that the frequency of SMBG was associated with lower fat intake. Patients are often taught to use SMBG to guide their self-management. This is one of the first studies to examine whether SMBG is associated with better dietary intake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-152
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Diabetes
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

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Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring
Diet
Fats
Vegetables
Fruit
Insulin
Self Care
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Fat intake
  • Fruit and vegetable intake
  • Self-management
  • Self-monitoring of blood glucose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Association between self-monitoring of blood glucose and diet among minority patients with diabetes. / McAndrew, Lisa M.; Horowitz, Carol R.; Lancaster, Kristie J.; Quigley, Karen S.; Pogach, Leonard M.; Mora, Pablo A.; Leventhal, Howard.

In: Journal of Diabetes, Vol. 3, No. 2, 06.2011, p. 147-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McAndrew, Lisa M. ; Horowitz, Carol R. ; Lancaster, Kristie J. ; Quigley, Karen S. ; Pogach, Leonard M. ; Mora, Pablo A. ; Leventhal, Howard. / Association between self-monitoring of blood glucose and diet among minority patients with diabetes. In: Journal of Diabetes. 2011 ; Vol. 3, No. 2. pp. 147-152.
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