Association between diet quality and measures of body adiposity using the Rate Your Plate survey in patients presenting for coronary angiography

Lisa Ganguzza, Calvin Ngai, Laura Flink, Kathleen Woolf, Yu Guo, Eugenia Gianos, Joseph Burdowski, James Slater, Victor Acosta, Tamsin Shephard, Binita Shah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Diet is a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease; however, dietary patterns are historically difficult to capture in the clinical setting. Healthcare providers need assessment tools that can quickly summarize dietary patterns. Research should evaluate the effectiveness of these tools, such as Rate Your Plate (RYP), in the clinical setting. Hypothesis: RYP diet quality scores are associated with measures of body adiposity in patients referred for coronary angiography. Methods: Patients without a history of coronary revascularization (n=400) were prospectively approached at a tertiary medical center in New York City prior to coronary angiography. Height, weight, and waist circumference (WC) were measured; body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) were calculated. Participants completed a 24-question RYP diet survey. An overall score was computed, and participants were divided into high (≥58) and low (≤57) diet quality groups. Results: Participants in the high diet quality group (n=98) had significantly lower measures of body adiposity than did those in the low diet quality group (n=302): BMI (P<0.001), WC (P=0.001), WHtR (P=0.001). There were small but significant inverse correlations between diet score and BMI, WC, and WHtR (P<0.001). These associations remained significant after adjustment for demographics, tobacco use, and socioeconomic factors. Conclusions: Higher diet quality scores are associated with lower measures of body adiposity. RYP is a potential instrument to capture diet quality in a high-volume clinical setting. Further research should evaluate the utility of RYP in cardiovascular risk-factor control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Cardiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2017

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Body Weights and Measures
Adiposity
Coronary Angiography
Diet
Waist Circumference
Body Mass Index
Diet Surveys
Needs Assessment
Surveys and Questionnaires
Tobacco Use
Research
Health Personnel
Cardiovascular Diseases
Demography
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Adiposity
  • BMI
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Diet
  • Diet Assessment
  • Diet Quality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Association between diet quality and measures of body adiposity using the Rate Your Plate survey in patients presenting for coronary angiography. / Ganguzza, Lisa; Ngai, Calvin; Flink, Laura; Woolf, Kathleen; Guo, Yu; Gianos, Eugenia; Burdowski, Joseph; Slater, James; Acosta, Victor; Shephard, Tamsin; Shah, Binita.

In: Clinical Cardiology, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ganguzza, Lisa ; Ngai, Calvin ; Flink, Laura ; Woolf, Kathleen ; Guo, Yu ; Gianos, Eugenia ; Burdowski, Joseph ; Slater, James ; Acosta, Victor ; Shephard, Tamsin ; Shah, Binita. / Association between diet quality and measures of body adiposity using the Rate Your Plate survey in patients presenting for coronary angiography. In: Clinical Cardiology. 2017.
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AU - Gianos, Eugenia

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AU - Acosta, Victor

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