Assisted Technologies of Social Reproduction

Pharmaceutical Prosthesis for Gender, Race, and Class in the White Opioid “Crisis”

Helena Hansen

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This article examines the symbolic work of gender as it intersects with race and class in popular media and in local community discourses surrounding the “suburban opioid epidemic,” in which national drug policies, and White futures, are thought to be at stake. The study starts with an analysis of the White, middle-class, female “new face of addiction” that has been cultivated by national press coverage of prescription opioid-cum-heroin overdoses in the U.S. and then turns to interviews with community physicians in the front line of a clinical response to the “epidemic” in Staten Island, a White suburban enclave within New York City that is experiencing 3–4 times the opioid overdose rate of any other City borough. Physicians use the language of family membership to indicate identification with their opioid addiction patients, and many go to lengths to provide holistic care and to incorporate family support for their patients despite lack of insurance reimbursement. White, educated patients describe buprenorphine as a way to maintain their professional identities, while low-income Black and Latino patients describe pharmaceutical maintenance as a socially alienating arm of the criminal justice system. Together, media and clinical responses make up strategies of White racial rescue from threatened social reproduction in an era of substance-induced White downward mobility.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)321-338
    Number of pages18
    JournalContemporary Drug Problems
    Volume44
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

    Fingerprint

    addiction
    pharmaceutical
    Opioid Analgesics
    Prostheses and Implants
    Reproduction
    physician
    Technology
    drug policy
    gender
    Pharmaceutical Preparations
    insurance
    community
    middle class
    medication
    low income
    coverage
    justice
    Physicians
    Buprenorphine
    Criminal Law

    Keywords

    • class
    • gender
    • opioids
    • race
    • women

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Health(social science)
    • Health Policy
    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
    • Law

    Cite this

    Assisted Technologies of Social Reproduction : Pharmaceutical Prosthesis for Gender, Race, and Class in the White Opioid “Crisis”. / Hansen, Helena.

    In: Contemporary Drug Problems, Vol. 44, No. 4, 01.12.2017, p. 321-338.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{d4ac697949334be8b7df6ef1457702fd,
    title = "Assisted Technologies of Social Reproduction: Pharmaceutical Prosthesis for Gender, Race, and Class in the White Opioid “Crisis”",
    abstract = "This article examines the symbolic work of gender as it intersects with race and class in popular media and in local community discourses surrounding the “suburban opioid epidemic,” in which national drug policies, and White futures, are thought to be at stake. The study starts with an analysis of the White, middle-class, female “new face of addiction” that has been cultivated by national press coverage of prescription opioid-cum-heroin overdoses in the U.S. and then turns to interviews with community physicians in the front line of a clinical response to the “epidemic” in Staten Island, a White suburban enclave within New York City that is experiencing 3–4 times the opioid overdose rate of any other City borough. Physicians use the language of family membership to indicate identification with their opioid addiction patients, and many go to lengths to provide holistic care and to incorporate family support for their patients despite lack of insurance reimbursement. White, educated patients describe buprenorphine as a way to maintain their professional identities, while low-income Black and Latino patients describe pharmaceutical maintenance as a socially alienating arm of the criminal justice system. Together, media and clinical responses make up strategies of White racial rescue from threatened social reproduction in an era of substance-induced White downward mobility.",
    keywords = "class, gender, opioids, race, women",
    author = "Helena Hansen",
    year = "2017",
    month = "12",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.1177/0091450917739391",
    language = "English (US)",
    volume = "44",
    pages = "321--338",
    journal = "Contemporary Drug Problems",
    issn = "0091-4509",
    publisher = "Federal Legal Publications Inc.",
    number = "4",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Assisted Technologies of Social Reproduction

    T2 - Pharmaceutical Prosthesis for Gender, Race, and Class in the White Opioid “Crisis”

    AU - Hansen, Helena

    PY - 2017/12/1

    Y1 - 2017/12/1

    N2 - This article examines the symbolic work of gender as it intersects with race and class in popular media and in local community discourses surrounding the “suburban opioid epidemic,” in which national drug policies, and White futures, are thought to be at stake. The study starts with an analysis of the White, middle-class, female “new face of addiction” that has been cultivated by national press coverage of prescription opioid-cum-heroin overdoses in the U.S. and then turns to interviews with community physicians in the front line of a clinical response to the “epidemic” in Staten Island, a White suburban enclave within New York City that is experiencing 3–4 times the opioid overdose rate of any other City borough. Physicians use the language of family membership to indicate identification with their opioid addiction patients, and many go to lengths to provide holistic care and to incorporate family support for their patients despite lack of insurance reimbursement. White, educated patients describe buprenorphine as a way to maintain their professional identities, while low-income Black and Latino patients describe pharmaceutical maintenance as a socially alienating arm of the criminal justice system. Together, media and clinical responses make up strategies of White racial rescue from threatened social reproduction in an era of substance-induced White downward mobility.

    AB - This article examines the symbolic work of gender as it intersects with race and class in popular media and in local community discourses surrounding the “suburban opioid epidemic,” in which national drug policies, and White futures, are thought to be at stake. The study starts with an analysis of the White, middle-class, female “new face of addiction” that has been cultivated by national press coverage of prescription opioid-cum-heroin overdoses in the U.S. and then turns to interviews with community physicians in the front line of a clinical response to the “epidemic” in Staten Island, a White suburban enclave within New York City that is experiencing 3–4 times the opioid overdose rate of any other City borough. Physicians use the language of family membership to indicate identification with their opioid addiction patients, and many go to lengths to provide holistic care and to incorporate family support for their patients despite lack of insurance reimbursement. White, educated patients describe buprenorphine as a way to maintain their professional identities, while low-income Black and Latino patients describe pharmaceutical maintenance as a socially alienating arm of the criminal justice system. Together, media and clinical responses make up strategies of White racial rescue from threatened social reproduction in an era of substance-induced White downward mobility.

    KW - class

    KW - gender

    KW - opioids

    KW - race

    KW - women

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85037056603&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85037056603&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1177/0091450917739391

    DO - 10.1177/0091450917739391

    M3 - Article

    VL - 44

    SP - 321

    EP - 338

    JO - Contemporary Drug Problems

    JF - Contemporary Drug Problems

    SN - 0091-4509

    IS - 4

    ER -