Assessing trustworthiness in collaborative environments

Jeffrey Segall, Michael Jay Mayhew, Michael Atighetchi, Rachel Greenstadt

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    Collaborative environments, specifically those concerning in- formation creation and exchange, increasingly demand notions of trust and accountability. In the absence of explicit authority, the quality of information is often unknown. Using Wikipedia edit sequences as a use case scenario, we detail experiments in the determination of community-based user and document trust. Our results show success in answering the first of many research questions: Provided a user's edit history, is a given edit to a document positively contributing to its content? We detail how the ability to answer this question provides a preliminary framework towards a better model for collaborative trust and discuss subsequent areas of research necessary to broaden its utility and scope.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publication8th Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop
    Subtitle of host publicationFederal Cyber Security R and D Program Thrusts, CSIIRW 2013
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Apr 15 2013
    Event8th Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop: Federal Cyber Security R and D Program Thrusts, CSIIRW 2013 - Oak Ridge, TN, United States
    Duration: Jan 8 2013Jan 10 2013

    Publication series

    NameACM International Conference Proceeding Series

    Conference

    Conference8th Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop: Federal Cyber Security R and D Program Thrusts, CSIIRW 2013
    CountryUnited States
    CityOak Ridge, TN
    Period1/8/131/10/13

    Fingerprint

    Experiments

    Keywords

    • Collaborative trust
    • Cyber analytics
    • Wikipedia

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Software
    • Human-Computer Interaction
    • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
    • Computer Networks and Communications

    Cite this

    Segall, J., Mayhew, M. J., Atighetchi, M., & Greenstadt, R. (2013). Assessing trustworthiness in collaborative environments. In 8th Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop: Federal Cyber Security R and D Program Thrusts, CSIIRW 2013 [52] (ACM International Conference Proceeding Series). https://doi.org/10.1145/2459976.2460035

    Assessing trustworthiness in collaborative environments. / Segall, Jeffrey; Mayhew, Michael Jay; Atighetchi, Michael; Greenstadt, Rachel.

    8th Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop: Federal Cyber Security R and D Program Thrusts, CSIIRW 2013. 2013. 52 (ACM International Conference Proceeding Series).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Segall, J, Mayhew, MJ, Atighetchi, M & Greenstadt, R 2013, Assessing trustworthiness in collaborative environments. in 8th Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop: Federal Cyber Security R and D Program Thrusts, CSIIRW 2013., 52, ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, 8th Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop: Federal Cyber Security R and D Program Thrusts, CSIIRW 2013, Oak Ridge, TN, United States, 1/8/13. https://doi.org/10.1145/2459976.2460035
    Segall J, Mayhew MJ, Atighetchi M, Greenstadt R. Assessing trustworthiness in collaborative environments. In 8th Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop: Federal Cyber Security R and D Program Thrusts, CSIIRW 2013. 2013. 52. (ACM International Conference Proceeding Series). https://doi.org/10.1145/2459976.2460035
    Segall, Jeffrey ; Mayhew, Michael Jay ; Atighetchi, Michael ; Greenstadt, Rachel. / Assessing trustworthiness in collaborative environments. 8th Annual Cyber Security and Information Intelligence Research Workshop: Federal Cyber Security R and D Program Thrusts, CSIIRW 2013. 2013. (ACM International Conference Proceeding Series).
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