ASSAULT PREVENTION AS SOCIAL CONTROL: WOMEN AND SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION ON URBAN COLLEGE CAMPUSES

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Sexual assault on U.S.A. college campuses is increasingly recognized as an urgent and pervasive national problem. To prevent assault, school administrators and individual women promote and adopt safety strategies that often compromise women's free and independent use of the campus environment. Such strategies may fail to correspond to the actual nature of sexual assault on campus. Based on open-ended interviews with college personnel and women students, this study examines sexual assault and personal crime prevention strategies at two midwestern, urban universities. School and individual strategies are characterized according to type, goals, and orientation. Findings explore the relationship of strategies to sexual assault on campus, and implications of strategies for women's use of public space. Conclusions suggest means to increase real safety while enhancing women's freedom and mobility on and near campus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-281
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Environmental Psychology
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1995

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Safety
Crime
Administrative Personnel
Interviews
Students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Social Psychology

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ASSAULT PREVENTION AS SOCIAL CONTROL : WOMEN AND SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION ON URBAN COLLEGE CAMPUSES. / DAY, KRISTEN.

In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, Vol. 15, No. 4, 12.1995, p. 261-281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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