Arrest outcomes associated with outpatient commitment in New York State

Bruce G. Link, Matthew W. Epperson, Brian E. Perron, Dorothy M. Castille, Larry Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This study examined whether assisted outpatient treatment (AOT) under New York's "Kendra's Law" is associated with reduced arrests for violent and nonviolent offenses. Methods: Arrest records of 183 study participants attending outpatient clinics in New York City, 86 of whom were ever and 97 of whom were never assigned to AOT, were compiled to yield 16,890 months of observation. For each month the data indicated whether an arrest did or did not occur and whether a participant was or was not assigned to AOT. Generalized estimating equations and fixed-effects analyses were used to compare arrest rates within different periods (before, during or shortly after, and more than six months after) for those ever assigned and between the ever- and never-assigned groups. Results: For those who received AOT, the odds of any arrest were 2.66 times greater (p<.01) and the odds of arrest for a violent offense 8.61 times greater (p<.05) before AOT than they were in the period during and shortly after AOT. The group never receiving AOT had nearly double the odds (1.91, p<.05) of arrest compared with the AOT group in the period during and shortly after assignment. Conclusions: Outpatient commitment under Kendra's Law in New York State is associated with a reduced risk of arrest. The coercion necessitated by application of the law may forestall, at least for some people, the potentially more potent and consequential coercion they would have experienced in the criminal justice system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)504-508
Number of pages5
JournalPsychiatric Services
Volume62
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

Fingerprint

Commitment of Mentally Ill
Outpatients
Coercion
Therapeutics
Criminal Law
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Observation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Arrest outcomes associated with outpatient commitment in New York State. / Link, Bruce G.; Epperson, Matthew W.; Perron, Brian E.; Castille, Dorothy M.; Yang, Larry.

In: Psychiatric Services, Vol. 62, No. 5, 05.2011, p. 504-508.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Link, Bruce G. ; Epperson, Matthew W. ; Perron, Brian E. ; Castille, Dorothy M. ; Yang, Larry. / Arrest outcomes associated with outpatient commitment in New York State. In: Psychiatric Services. 2011 ; Vol. 62, No. 5. pp. 504-508.
@article{3712159749334da2b327d797ff42991e,
title = "Arrest outcomes associated with outpatient commitment in New York State",
abstract = "Objective: This study examined whether assisted outpatient treatment (AOT) under New York's {"}Kendra's Law{"} is associated with reduced arrests for violent and nonviolent offenses. Methods: Arrest records of 183 study participants attending outpatient clinics in New York City, 86 of whom were ever and 97 of whom were never assigned to AOT, were compiled to yield 16,890 months of observation. For each month the data indicated whether an arrest did or did not occur and whether a participant was or was not assigned to AOT. Generalized estimating equations and fixed-effects analyses were used to compare arrest rates within different periods (before, during or shortly after, and more than six months after) for those ever assigned and between the ever- and never-assigned groups. Results: For those who received AOT, the odds of any arrest were 2.66 times greater (p<.01) and the odds of arrest for a violent offense 8.61 times greater (p<.05) before AOT than they were in the period during and shortly after AOT. The group never receiving AOT had nearly double the odds (1.91, p<.05) of arrest compared with the AOT group in the period during and shortly after assignment. Conclusions: Outpatient commitment under Kendra's Law in New York State is associated with a reduced risk of arrest. The coercion necessitated by application of the law may forestall, at least for some people, the potentially more potent and consequential coercion they would have experienced in the criminal justice system.",
author = "Link, {Bruce G.} and Epperson, {Matthew W.} and Perron, {Brian E.} and Castille, {Dorothy M.} and Larry Yang",
year = "2011",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1176/appi.ps.62.5.504",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "62",
pages = "504--508",
journal = "Psychiatric Services",
issn = "1075-2730",
publisher = "American Psychiatric Association",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Arrest outcomes associated with outpatient commitment in New York State

AU - Link, Bruce G.

AU - Epperson, Matthew W.

AU - Perron, Brian E.

AU - Castille, Dorothy M.

AU - Yang, Larry

PY - 2011/5

Y1 - 2011/5

N2 - Objective: This study examined whether assisted outpatient treatment (AOT) under New York's "Kendra's Law" is associated with reduced arrests for violent and nonviolent offenses. Methods: Arrest records of 183 study participants attending outpatient clinics in New York City, 86 of whom were ever and 97 of whom were never assigned to AOT, were compiled to yield 16,890 months of observation. For each month the data indicated whether an arrest did or did not occur and whether a participant was or was not assigned to AOT. Generalized estimating equations and fixed-effects analyses were used to compare arrest rates within different periods (before, during or shortly after, and more than six months after) for those ever assigned and between the ever- and never-assigned groups. Results: For those who received AOT, the odds of any arrest were 2.66 times greater (p<.01) and the odds of arrest for a violent offense 8.61 times greater (p<.05) before AOT than they were in the period during and shortly after AOT. The group never receiving AOT had nearly double the odds (1.91, p<.05) of arrest compared with the AOT group in the period during and shortly after assignment. Conclusions: Outpatient commitment under Kendra's Law in New York State is associated with a reduced risk of arrest. The coercion necessitated by application of the law may forestall, at least for some people, the potentially more potent and consequential coercion they would have experienced in the criminal justice system.

AB - Objective: This study examined whether assisted outpatient treatment (AOT) under New York's "Kendra's Law" is associated with reduced arrests for violent and nonviolent offenses. Methods: Arrest records of 183 study participants attending outpatient clinics in New York City, 86 of whom were ever and 97 of whom were never assigned to AOT, were compiled to yield 16,890 months of observation. For each month the data indicated whether an arrest did or did not occur and whether a participant was or was not assigned to AOT. Generalized estimating equations and fixed-effects analyses were used to compare arrest rates within different periods (before, during or shortly after, and more than six months after) for those ever assigned and between the ever- and never-assigned groups. Results: For those who received AOT, the odds of any arrest were 2.66 times greater (p<.01) and the odds of arrest for a violent offense 8.61 times greater (p<.05) before AOT than they were in the period during and shortly after AOT. The group never receiving AOT had nearly double the odds (1.91, p<.05) of arrest compared with the AOT group in the period during and shortly after assignment. Conclusions: Outpatient commitment under Kendra's Law in New York State is associated with a reduced risk of arrest. The coercion necessitated by application of the law may forestall, at least for some people, the potentially more potent and consequential coercion they would have experienced in the criminal justice system.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79955673068&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79955673068&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1176/appi.ps.62.5.504

DO - 10.1176/appi.ps.62.5.504

M3 - Article

C2 - 21532076

AN - SCOPUS:79955673068

VL - 62

SP - 504

EP - 508

JO - Psychiatric Services

JF - Psychiatric Services

SN - 1075-2730

IS - 5

ER -