Are Representations in Working Memory Distinct from Representations in Long-Term Memory? Neural Evidence in Support of a Single Store

Ilke Öztekin, Lila Davachi, Brian McElree

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Neural activation in a 12-item probe-recognition task was examined to investigate the contribution of the hippocampus to long-term memory (LTM) retrieval and working memory (WM) retrieval. Results indicated a dissociation between the last item that participants studied and other items of the study list: Compared with all other serial positions, activation was reduced for the item in the most recent position (for which no items intervened between study and test). This finding suggests that this last item was in focal attention at test time, and, therefore, no retrieval operation was required to access it. However, contra the assertion that the hippocampus should selectively support LTM, activation of the medial temporal lobe was observed for all serial positions other than the last position, and activation level could be predicted from the underlying memory strength. Collectively, these findings support single-store accounts that assume there are similar operating principles across WM and LTM representations, and the focus of attention is limited.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1123-1133
Number of pages11
JournalPsychological Science
Volume21
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010

Fingerprint

Long-Term Memory
Short-Term Memory
Hippocampus
Temporal Lobe

Keywords

  • focal attention
  • functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)
  • hippocampus
  • item recognition
  • long-term memory
  • medial temporal lobe
  • memory systems
  • short-term memory
  • working memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Are Representations in Working Memory Distinct from Representations in Long-Term Memory? Neural Evidence in Support of a Single Store. / Öztekin, Ilke; Davachi, Lila; McElree, Brian.

In: Psychological Science, Vol. 21, No. 8, 08.2010, p. 1123-1133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{87a6a9689b68451182e94a9abafdc29f,
title = "Are Representations in Working Memory Distinct from Representations in Long-Term Memory? Neural Evidence in Support of a Single Store",
abstract = "Neural activation in a 12-item probe-recognition task was examined to investigate the contribution of the hippocampus to long-term memory (LTM) retrieval and working memory (WM) retrieval. Results indicated a dissociation between the last item that participants studied and other items of the study list: Compared with all other serial positions, activation was reduced for the item in the most recent position (for which no items intervened between study and test). This finding suggests that this last item was in focal attention at test time, and, therefore, no retrieval operation was required to access it. However, contra the assertion that the hippocampus should selectively support LTM, activation of the medial temporal lobe was observed for all serial positions other than the last position, and activation level could be predicted from the underlying memory strength. Collectively, these findings support single-store accounts that assume there are similar operating principles across WM and LTM representations, and the focus of attention is limited.",
keywords = "focal attention, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), hippocampus, item recognition, long-term memory, medial temporal lobe, memory systems, short-term memory, working memory",
author = "Ilke {\"O}ztekin and Lila Davachi and Brian McElree",
year = "2010",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1177/0956797610376651",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "1123--1133",
journal = "Psychological Science",
issn = "0956-7976",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are Representations in Working Memory Distinct from Representations in Long-Term Memory? Neural Evidence in Support of a Single Store

AU - Öztekin, Ilke

AU - Davachi, Lila

AU - McElree, Brian

PY - 2010/8

Y1 - 2010/8

N2 - Neural activation in a 12-item probe-recognition task was examined to investigate the contribution of the hippocampus to long-term memory (LTM) retrieval and working memory (WM) retrieval. Results indicated a dissociation between the last item that participants studied and other items of the study list: Compared with all other serial positions, activation was reduced for the item in the most recent position (for which no items intervened between study and test). This finding suggests that this last item was in focal attention at test time, and, therefore, no retrieval operation was required to access it. However, contra the assertion that the hippocampus should selectively support LTM, activation of the medial temporal lobe was observed for all serial positions other than the last position, and activation level could be predicted from the underlying memory strength. Collectively, these findings support single-store accounts that assume there are similar operating principles across WM and LTM representations, and the focus of attention is limited.

AB - Neural activation in a 12-item probe-recognition task was examined to investigate the contribution of the hippocampus to long-term memory (LTM) retrieval and working memory (WM) retrieval. Results indicated a dissociation between the last item that participants studied and other items of the study list: Compared with all other serial positions, activation was reduced for the item in the most recent position (for which no items intervened between study and test). This finding suggests that this last item was in focal attention at test time, and, therefore, no retrieval operation was required to access it. However, contra the assertion that the hippocampus should selectively support LTM, activation of the medial temporal lobe was observed for all serial positions other than the last position, and activation level could be predicted from the underlying memory strength. Collectively, these findings support single-store accounts that assume there are similar operating principles across WM and LTM representations, and the focus of attention is limited.

KW - focal attention

KW - functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

KW - hippocampus

KW - item recognition

KW - long-term memory

KW - medial temporal lobe

KW - memory systems

KW - short-term memory

KW - working memory

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78149443030&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78149443030&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0956797610376651

DO - 10.1177/0956797610376651

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 1123

EP - 1133

JO - Psychological Science

JF - Psychological Science

SN - 0956-7976

IS - 8

ER -