Are Muslim immigrants different in terms of cultural integration?

Alberto Bisin, Eleonora Patacchini, Thierry Verdier, Yves Zenou

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Using the UK Fourth National Survey of Ethnic Minorities, we document differences in integration patterns between Muslims and non-Muslims. We find that Muslims integrate less and more slowly than non-Muslims. In terms of estimated probability of having a strong religious identity, a Muslim born in the UK and having spent there more than 30 years is comparable with a non-Muslim just arrived in the country. Moreover, higher levels of income as well as higher on-the-job qualifications seem to be associated with a stronger religious identity for Muslim immigrants only. Finally, we find no evidence that segregated neighborhoods breed intense religious and cultural identities for ethnic minorities, in general, and, in particular, for Muslims.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)445-456
    Number of pages12
    JournalJournal of the European Economic Association
    Volume6
    Issue number2-3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Apr 2008

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    Cultural integration
    Muslims
    Immigrants
    Ethnic minorities
    Cultural identity
    Income
    Qualification

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)

    Cite this

    Are Muslim immigrants different in terms of cultural integration? / Bisin, Alberto; Patacchini, Eleonora; Verdier, Thierry; Zenou, Yves.

    In: Journal of the European Economic Association, Vol. 6, No. 2-3, 04.2008, p. 445-456.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Bisin, Alberto ; Patacchini, Eleonora ; Verdier, Thierry ; Zenou, Yves. / Are Muslim immigrants different in terms of cultural integration?. In: Journal of the European Economic Association. 2008 ; Vol. 6, No. 2-3. pp. 445-456.
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