Application of the social action theory to understand factors associated with risky sexual behavior among individuals in residential substance abuse treatment

Elizabeth K. Reynolds, Jessica F. Magidson, Marina A. Bornovalova, Marya Gwadz, Craig K. Ewart, Stacey B. Daughters, C. W. Lejuez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Risky sexual behavior (RSB) is a leading cause of HIV/AIDS, particularly among urban substance users. Using the social action theory, an integrative systems model of sociocognitive, motivational, and environmental influences, as a guiding framework, the current study examined (1) environmental influences, (2) psychopathology and affect, (3) HIV-related attitudes and knowledge, and (4) self-regulatory skills/deficits as factors associated with event-level condom use (CU) among a sample of 156 substance users residing at a residential substance abuse treatment center (M age = 41.85; SD = 8.59; 75% male). RSB was assessed using event-level measurement of CU given its advantages for improved accuracy of recall and ability for an examination of situational variables. A logistic regression predicting event-level CU indicated the significant contribution of partner type (environmental influences), less favorable attitudes towards condoms (HIV-related attitudes and knowledge), and higher levels of risk-taking propensity (self-regulatory skills/deficits) in predicting greater likelihood of not having used a condom at one's most recent sexual encounter. This study contributes to the literature examining HIV risk behaviors among substance users within a theory-driven model of risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)311-321
Number of pages11
JournalPsychology of Addictive Behaviors
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010

Fingerprint

Condoms
Sexual Behavior
Substance-Related Disorders
HIV
Risk-Taking
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Aptitude
Psychopathology
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Logistic Models
Social Theory

Keywords

  • Event level
  • HIV
  • Risky sexual behavior
  • Substance users

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Application of the social action theory to understand factors associated with risky sexual behavior among individuals in residential substance abuse treatment. / Reynolds, Elizabeth K.; Magidson, Jessica F.; Bornovalova, Marina A.; Gwadz, Marya; Ewart, Craig K.; Daughters, Stacey B.; Lejuez, C. W.

In: Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 24, No. 2, 06.2010, p. 311-321.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reynolds, Elizabeth K. ; Magidson, Jessica F. ; Bornovalova, Marina A. ; Gwadz, Marya ; Ewart, Craig K. ; Daughters, Stacey B. ; Lejuez, C. W. / Application of the social action theory to understand factors associated with risky sexual behavior among individuals in residential substance abuse treatment. In: Psychology of Addictive Behaviors. 2010 ; Vol. 24, No. 2. pp. 311-321.
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