Application of suction caisson foundations in the Gulf of Mexico

Sherif L. El-Gharbawy, Magued Iskander, Roy E. Olson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In the last decade, use of suction caissons (suction piles) has increased in offshore arena. Suction caissons have the appearance of inverted buckets with sealed tops and are installed by pumping water out of them. Pumping creates a differential pressure across the top pushing the caisson into place, and thus eliminating the need for driving. Suction can be used also to resist axial tensile loads. Suction caissons realize economical advantages over traditional driven piles due to the speed of installation, elimination of the pile driving process, and reduction in material costs. There are a number of uncertainties in the design of suction caissons. The state of stress and soil conditions adjacent to a suction caisson may be different from those surrounding driven or bored piles; thus experience-based design methods may not work well with suction caissons. The tensile load capacity of suction caissons depends primarily on the hydraulic conductivity and the shearing strength properties of the foundation material, drainage length, and rate of loading. The relationship between the various parameters affecting the tensile capacity is not clearly understood. Furthermore, during pullout, volume change characteristics of the surrounding soils may change the theoretical suction pressures. A review of the existing knowledge relating to the design and construction of suction caissons is presented in this paper. Experimental results from a number of laboratory studies in sand and clay are also presented along with case histories.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Annual Offshore Technology Conference
PublisherOffshore Technol Conf
Pages531-538
Number of pages8
Volume1
StatePublished - 1997
EventProceedings of the 1998 30th Offshore Technology Conference, OTC. Part 1 (of 4) - Houston, TX, USA
Duration: May 4 1997May 7 1997

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1998 30th Offshore Technology Conference, OTC. Part 1 (of 4)
CityHouston, TX, USA
Period5/4/975/7/97

Fingerprint

Caissons
caisson
suction
Piles
pile
Pile driving
pumping
Soils
gulf
Hydraulic conductivity
pile driving
Shearing
Drainage
volume change
design method
Clay
Sand
hydraulic conductivity
drainage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology
  • Ocean Engineering

Cite this

El-Gharbawy, S. L., Iskander, M., & Olson, R. E. (1997). Application of suction caisson foundations in the Gulf of Mexico. In Proceedings of the Annual Offshore Technology Conference (Vol. 1, pp. 531-538). Offshore Technol Conf.

Application of suction caisson foundations in the Gulf of Mexico. / El-Gharbawy, Sherif L.; Iskander, Magued; Olson, Roy E.

Proceedings of the Annual Offshore Technology Conference. Vol. 1 Offshore Technol Conf, 1997. p. 531-538.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

El-Gharbawy, SL, Iskander, M & Olson, RE 1997, Application of suction caisson foundations in the Gulf of Mexico. in Proceedings of the Annual Offshore Technology Conference. vol. 1, Offshore Technol Conf, pp. 531-538, Proceedings of the 1998 30th Offshore Technology Conference, OTC. Part 1 (of 4), Houston, TX, USA, 5/4/97.
El-Gharbawy SL, Iskander M, Olson RE. Application of suction caisson foundations in the Gulf of Mexico. In Proceedings of the Annual Offshore Technology Conference. Vol. 1. Offshore Technol Conf. 1997. p. 531-538
El-Gharbawy, Sherif L. ; Iskander, Magued ; Olson, Roy E. / Application of suction caisson foundations in the Gulf of Mexico. Proceedings of the Annual Offshore Technology Conference. Vol. 1 Offshore Technol Conf, 1997. pp. 531-538
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