Analysis of selection effects in New York City's Medicaid managed care population prior to mandatory enrollment

John Billings, T. Mijanovich, T. Frenkel, J. Cantor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It is becoming increasingly apparent that over the next several years the majority of Medicaid patients in many states will become enrolled in managed care plans, some voluntarily, but most as the result of mandatory initiatives. An important issue related to this development is the extent to which this movement to managed care is accompanied by serious selection effects, either across the board during the phase in or among individual plans or plan types with full-scale implementation. This paper examines selection effects in New York City between 1993 and 1997 during the voluntary enrollment period prior to implementation of mandatory enrollment pursuant to a Section 1115 waiver. No substantial selection bias was documented between patients entering managed care and those remaining in the fee-for-service system among the largest rate groups, although some selection effect was found among plans and plan types (with investor-owned plans enrolling patients with lower prior utilization and expenses).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)625-644
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Urban Health
Volume77
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2000

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Medicaid
Managed Care Programs
managed care
Population
Fee-for-Service Plans
Selection Bias
fee
investor
utilization
trend
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Analysis of selection effects in New York City's Medicaid managed care population prior to mandatory enrollment. / Billings, John; Mijanovich, T.; Frenkel, T.; Cantor, J.

In: Journal of Urban Health, Vol. 77, No. 4, 2000, p. 625-644.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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