An inverse relationship to germline transcription defines centromeric chromatin in C. elegans

Reto Gassmann, Andreas Rechtsteiner, Karen W. Yuen, Andrew Muroyama, Thea Egelhofer, Laura Gaydos, Francie Barron, Paul Maddox, Anthony Essex, Joost Monen, Sevinc Ercan, Jason D. Lieb, Karen Oegema, Susan Strome, Arshad Desai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Centromeres are chromosomal loci that direct segregation of the genome during cell division. The histone H3 variant CENP-A (also known as CenH3) defines centromeres in monocentric organisms, which confine centromere activity to a discrete chromosomal region, and holocentric organisms, which distribute centromere activity along the chromosome length. Because the highly repetitive DNA found at most centromeres is neither necessary nor sufficient for centromere function, stable inheritance of CENP-A nucleosomal chromatin is postulated to propagate centromere identity epigenetically. Here, we show that in the holocentric nematode Caenorhabditis elegans pre-existing CENP-A nucleosomes are not necessary to guide recruitment of new CENP-A nucleosomes. This is indicated by lack of CENP-A transmission by sperm during fertilization and by removal and subsequent reloading of CENP-A during oogenic meiotic prophase. Genome-wide mapping of CENP-A location in embryos and quantification of CENP-A molecules in nuclei revealed that CENP-A is incorporated at low density in domains that cumulatively encompass half the genome. Embryonic CENP-A domains are established in a pattern inverse to regions that are transcribed in the germline and early embryo, and ectopic transcription of genes in a mutant germline altered the pattern of CENP-A incorporation in embryos. Furthermore, regions transcribed in the germline but not embryos fail to incorporate CENP-A throughout embryogenesis. We propose that germline transcription defines genomic regions that exclude CENP-A incorporation in progeny, and that zygotic transcription during early embryogenesis remodels and reinforces this basal pattern. These findings link centromere identity to transcription and shed light on the evolutionary plasticity of centromeres.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)534-537
Number of pages4
JournalNature
Volume484
Issue number7395
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 26 2012

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Chromatin
Centromere
Embryonic Structures
Nucleosomes
centromere protein A
Embryonic Development
Genome
Prophase
Chromosome Mapping
Caenorhabditis elegans
Fertilization
Cell Division
Histones
Spermatozoa
Chromosomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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Gassmann, R., Rechtsteiner, A., Yuen, K. W., Muroyama, A., Egelhofer, T., Gaydos, L., ... Desai, A. (2012). An inverse relationship to germline transcription defines centromeric chromatin in C. elegans. Nature, 484(7395), 534-537. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature10973

An inverse relationship to germline transcription defines centromeric chromatin in C. elegans. / Gassmann, Reto; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Yuen, Karen W.; Muroyama, Andrew; Egelhofer, Thea; Gaydos, Laura; Barron, Francie; Maddox, Paul; Essex, Anthony; Monen, Joost; Ercan, Sevinc; Lieb, Jason D.; Oegema, Karen; Strome, Susan; Desai, Arshad.

In: Nature, Vol. 484, No. 7395, 26.04.2012, p. 534-537.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gassmann, R, Rechtsteiner, A, Yuen, KW, Muroyama, A, Egelhofer, T, Gaydos, L, Barron, F, Maddox, P, Essex, A, Monen, J, Ercan, S, Lieb, JD, Oegema, K, Strome, S & Desai, A 2012, 'An inverse relationship to germline transcription defines centromeric chromatin in C. elegans', Nature, vol. 484, no. 7395, pp. 534-537. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature10973
Gassmann R, Rechtsteiner A, Yuen KW, Muroyama A, Egelhofer T, Gaydos L et al. An inverse relationship to germline transcription defines centromeric chromatin in C. elegans. Nature. 2012 Apr 26;484(7395):534-537. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature10973
Gassmann, Reto ; Rechtsteiner, Andreas ; Yuen, Karen W. ; Muroyama, Andrew ; Egelhofer, Thea ; Gaydos, Laura ; Barron, Francie ; Maddox, Paul ; Essex, Anthony ; Monen, Joost ; Ercan, Sevinc ; Lieb, Jason D. ; Oegema, Karen ; Strome, Susan ; Desai, Arshad. / An inverse relationship to germline transcription defines centromeric chromatin in C. elegans. In: Nature. 2012 ; Vol. 484, No. 7395. pp. 534-537.
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