An fMRI study of frontostriatal circuits during the inhibition of eye blinking in persons with Tourette syndrome

Luigi Mazzone, Shan Yu, Clancy Blair, Benjamin C. Gunter, Zhishun Wang, Rachel Marsh, Bradley S. Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The authors sought to study activity in neural circuits that subserve the inhibition of a semi-involuntary motor behavior, eye blinking, in children and adults with Tourette syndrome and in healthy comparison subjects. Method: Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to scan 120 participants (51 with Tourette syndrome and 69 comparison subjects) as they either blinked normally or successfully inhibited eye blinking. The authors compared the blood-oxygen-level dependent signal during these two conditions across the Tourette and comparison groups. Results: Relative to comparison subjects, patients with Tourette syndrome activated more strongly the frontal cortex and striatum during eye blink inhibition. Activation increased more with age in the dorsolateral and inferolateral prefrontal cortex and caudate nucleus in the Tourette group relative to comparison subjects. In addition, the Tourette group more strongly activated the middle frontal gyrus, dorsal anterior cingulate, and temporal cortices. The severity of tic symptoms in the Tourette group correlated inversely with activation in the putamen and inferolateral prefrontal cortex. Conclusions: Frontostriatal activity is increased in persons with Tourette syndrome during the inhibition of eye blinks. Activation of frontostriatal circuits in this population may help to maintain regulatory control over semi-involuntary behaviors, whether these are tics or eye blinks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)341-349
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume167
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010

Fingerprint

Blinking
Tourette Syndrome
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Tics
Prefrontal Cortex
Caudate Nucleus
Putamen
Gyrus Cinguli
Frontal Lobe
Temporal Lobe
Healthy Volunteers
Inhibition (Psychology)
Oxygen
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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An fMRI study of frontostriatal circuits during the inhibition of eye blinking in persons with Tourette syndrome. / Mazzone, Luigi; Yu, Shan; Blair, Clancy; Gunter, Benjamin C.; Wang, Zhishun; Marsh, Rachel; Peterson, Bradley S.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 167, No. 3, 03.2010, p. 341-349.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mazzone, Luigi ; Yu, Shan ; Blair, Clancy ; Gunter, Benjamin C. ; Wang, Zhishun ; Marsh, Rachel ; Peterson, Bradley S. / An fMRI study of frontostriatal circuits during the inhibition of eye blinking in persons with Tourette syndrome. In: American Journal of Psychiatry. 2010 ; Vol. 167, No. 3. pp. 341-349.
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