An evaluation of the relationship between self-report and biochemical measures of environmental tobacco smoke exposure

Karen M. Emmons, David Abrams, Robert Marshall, Bess H. Marcus, Margaret Kane, Thomas E. Novotny, Ruth A. Etzel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To evaluate the relationship between self-reported exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and saliva cotinine concentrations, we studied 186 nonsmokers. Each participant completed an exposure questionnaire, kept a daily exposure diary for 7 days, and provided a saliva sample for cotinine analysis. Salivary cotinine concentrations were measured using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. of the volunteers, 30% lived with one or more smokers, and 84% were regularly exposed to smokers at work. Eighty-three percent of the volunteers had detectable saliva cotinine concentrations (≥0.5 ng/ml) (median = 1.1; range = 0.5-7.4 ng/ml). Cotinine concentrations were related to exposure in the household and at the workplace. Volunteers who lived with smokers had significantly higher cotinine levels (median = 1.0; range = <0.5-7.4 ng/ml) than those who did not (median = <0.5; range = <0.5-4.7 ng/ml). Volunteers who reported regular exposure at work had higher cotinine levels (median = 0.8; range = <0.5-7.4 ng/ml) than those who did not (median = <0.5; range = <0.5-3.0 ng/ml). Cotinine concentrations were predicted by a regression equation that included the number of smokers at home and work and the number of minutes of exposure recorded in the daily diary (r2 = 0.29).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-39
Number of pages5
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994

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Cotinine
Smoke
Self Report
Tobacco
Volunteers
Saliva
Environmental Exposure
Workplace
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

An evaluation of the relationship between self-report and biochemical measures of environmental tobacco smoke exposure. / Emmons, Karen M.; Abrams, David; Marshall, Robert; Marcus, Bess H.; Kane, Margaret; Novotny, Thomas E.; Etzel, Ruth A.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 23, No. 1, 1994, p. 35-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Emmons, Karen M. ; Abrams, David ; Marshall, Robert ; Marcus, Bess H. ; Kane, Margaret ; Novotny, Thomas E. ; Etzel, Ruth A. / An evaluation of the relationship between self-report and biochemical measures of environmental tobacco smoke exposure. In: Preventive Medicine. 1994 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 35-39.
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