Alu insertion polymorphisms as evidence for population structure in baboons

The Baboon Genome Analysis Consortium

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Male dispersal from the natal group at or near maturity is a feature of most baboon (Papio) species. It potentially has profound effects upon population structure and evolutionary processes, but dispersal, especially for unusually long distances, is not readily documented by direct field observation. In this pilot study, we investigate the possibility of retrieving baboon population structure in yellow (Papio cynocephalus) and kinda (Papio kindae) baboons from the distribution of variation in a genome-wide set of 494 Alu insertion polymorphisms, made available via the recently completed Baboon Genome Analysis Consortium. Alu insertion variation in a mixed population derived from yellow and olive (Papio anubis) baboons identified each individual's proportion of heritage from either parental species. In an unmixed yellow baboon population, our analysis showed greater similarity between neighboring than between more distantly situated groups, suggesting structuring of the population by male dispersal distance. Finally (and very provisionally), an unexpectedly sharp difference in Alu insertion frequencies between members of neighboring social groups of kinda baboons suggests that intergroup migration may be more rare than predicted in this little known species.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)2418-2427
    Number of pages10
    JournalGenome Biology and Evolution
    Volume9
    Issue number9
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

    Fingerprint

    Papio
    population structure
    polymorphism
    genetic polymorphism
    genome
    Population
    Papio cynocephalus
    Papio anubis
    Genome
    Olea
    analysis
    Observation

    Keywords

    • Alu
    • Population genetics
    • Population structure
    • Retrotransposon

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
    • Genetics

    Cite this

    Alu insertion polymorphisms as evidence for population structure in baboons. / The Baboon Genome Analysis Consortium.

    In: Genome Biology and Evolution, Vol. 9, No. 9, 01.09.2017, p. 2418-2427.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    The Baboon Genome Analysis Consortium. / Alu insertion polymorphisms as evidence for population structure in baboons. In: Genome Biology and Evolution. 2017 ; Vol. 9, No. 9. pp. 2418-2427.
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    abstract = "Male dispersal from the natal group at or near maturity is a feature of most baboon (Papio) species. It potentially has profound effects upon population structure and evolutionary processes, but dispersal, especially for unusually long distances, is not readily documented by direct field observation. In this pilot study, we investigate the possibility of retrieving baboon population structure in yellow (Papio cynocephalus) and kinda (Papio kindae) baboons from the distribution of variation in a genome-wide set of 494 Alu insertion polymorphisms, made available via the recently completed Baboon Genome Analysis Consortium. Alu insertion variation in a mixed population derived from yellow and olive (Papio anubis) baboons identified each individual's proportion of heritage from either parental species. In an unmixed yellow baboon population, our analysis showed greater similarity between neighboring than between more distantly situated groups, suggesting structuring of the population by male dispersal distance. Finally (and very provisionally), an unexpectedly sharp difference in Alu insertion frequencies between members of neighboring social groups of kinda baboons suggests that intergroup migration may be more rare than predicted in this little known species.",
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