All-or-none versus progressive approach in an approach-avoidance conflict

Milton A. Trapold, Neal E. Miller, Edgar Coons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Rats were trained to run down a 100-ft.-long runway for food; shock was then introduced at the goal and increased on subsequent trials until S failed to reach the goal. Under 24-hr. deprivation, test trials were run with S started near the goal and then far from the goal; the 1st movement of most Ss was toward the goal under both conditions. When hunger was reduced to 4 hr. and then increased by 24 hr. on each successive trial, all Ss approached part way and then stopped on most trials, generally approaching closer to the goal on the trials conducted under conditions of greater hunger. From Psyc Abstracts 36:01:1EK93T. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-296
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology
Volume53
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1960

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Hunger
Conflict (Psychology)
Shock
Food

Keywords

  • CONFLICT, APPROACH-AVOIDANCE
  • LEARNING

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

All-or-none versus progressive approach in an approach-avoidance conflict. / Trapold, Milton A.; Miller, Neal E.; Coons, Edgar.

In: Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, Vol. 53, No. 3, 06.1960, p. 293-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Trapold, Milton A. ; Miller, Neal E. ; Coons, Edgar. / All-or-none versus progressive approach in an approach-avoidance conflict. In: Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology. 1960 ; Vol. 53, No. 3. pp. 293-296.
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