African American and European American therapists' experiences of addressing race in cross-racial psychotherapy dyads

Sarah Knox, Alan W. Burkard, Adanna J. Johnson, Lisa A. Suzuki, Joseph G. Ponterotto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Using Consensual Qualitative Research, 12 licensed psychologists' overall experiences addressing race in psychotherapy were investigated, as were their experiences addressing race in a specific cross-racial therapy dyad. Results indicated that only African American psychologists reported routinely addressing race with clients of color or when race was part of a client's presenting concern. European American psychologists indicated that they would address race if clients raised the topic, and some reported that they did not normally address race with racially different clients. When discussing a specific cross-racial dyad, African American therapists more often than European American therapists addressed race because they perceived client discomfort. Only European American therapists reported feeling uncomfortable addressing race, but therapists of both races perceived that such discussions had positive effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)466-481
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Counseling Psychology
Volume50
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2003

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Psychotherapy
African Americans
Psychology
Qualitative Research
Emotions
Color

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

African American and European American therapists' experiences of addressing race in cross-racial psychotherapy dyads. / Knox, Sarah; Burkard, Alan W.; Johnson, Adanna J.; Suzuki, Lisa A.; Ponterotto, Joseph G.

In: Journal of Counseling Psychology, Vol. 50, No. 4, 10.2003, p. 466-481.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Knox, Sarah ; Burkard, Alan W. ; Johnson, Adanna J. ; Suzuki, Lisa A. ; Ponterotto, Joseph G. / African American and European American therapists' experiences of addressing race in cross-racial psychotherapy dyads. In: Journal of Counseling Psychology. 2003 ; Vol. 50, No. 4. pp. 466-481.
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