African American and Black as Demographic Codes

Renee Blake

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This article addresses the semantics of ethnicity/race and ethnic/racial categorization in the United States and its role in sociolinguistic inquiry. The focus is on scholars' ethnic/racial coding of African American, which is used interchangeably with the label Black. While there has been a growing body of research that shows African American English (AAE) varies both regionally and across social lines (e.g., age, gender, class), slow to follow is work addressing variation within the ethnic/racial category African American/Black in and of itself. This paper argues the field of sociolinguistics and related fields are at a crossroads in terms of how we categorize people within ethnically diverse African American/Black communities in the United States and offers methodological solutions.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)548-563
    Number of pages16
    JournalLinguistics and Language Compass
    Volume8
    Issue number11
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

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    sociolinguistics
    coding
    ethnicity
    semantics
    American
    gender
    community

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Linguistics and Language

    Cite this

    African American and Black as Demographic Codes. / Blake, Renee.

    In: Linguistics and Language Compass, Vol. 8, No. 11, 01.11.2014, p. 548-563.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Blake, Renee. / African American and Black as Demographic Codes. In: Linguistics and Language Compass. 2014 ; Vol. 8, No. 11. pp. 548-563.
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