African American adolescents and new media

Associations with HIV/STI risk behavior and psychosocial variables

Laura B. Whiteley, Larry K. Brown, Rebecca R. Swenson, Daniel Romer, Ralph DiClemente, Laura F. Salazar, Peter A. Vanable, Michael P. Carey, Robert F. Valois

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Cell phones and online media are used frequently but we know little about their use among African American adolescents. This study examines the frequency of such use and its relationship to psychosocial variables and STI/HIV risk behavior. Setting/Participants: 1,518 African American, aged 13-18 years, from 2 Northeast US cities (Providence, RI; Syracuse, NY) and 2 Southeast US cities (Columbia, SC; Macon, GA), were assessed from 2008-2009. Design: Participants were assessed on frequency of cell phone and Internet use, psychological constructs (ie, depression, life satisfaction, impulsivity) and HIV/STI risk behaviors (ie, history of intercourse, sexual sensation seeking attitudes, peer sexual risks norms) with reliable scales and measures using an audio computer-assisted self-interview. Results: Over 90% of African American adolescents used cell phones every day or most days and 60% used social networking sites every day or most days (96% used Myspace). Greater frequency of cell phone use was associated with sexual sensation seeking (P=.000), riskier peer sexual norms (P=.000), and impulsivity (P=.016). Greater frequency of Internet use was associated with a history of oral/vaginal/anal sex (OR=1.03, CI=1.0-1.05) and sexual sensation seeking (P=.000). Conclusion: These findings suggest that riskier youth are online and using cell phones frequently. The Internet and cell phones may be useful platforms for targeted health promotion and prevention efforts with AA adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)216-222
Number of pages7
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume21
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011

Fingerprint

Cell Phones
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Risk-Taking
African Americans
HIV
Internet
Impulsive Behavior
Lepidium
Social Networking
Interviews
Southeastern United States
Coitus
Health Promotion
Sexual Behavior
Depression
Psychology

Keywords

  • African american adolescents
  • Hiv/sti risk
  • Psychosocial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Whiteley, L. B., Brown, L. K., Swenson, R. R., Romer, D., DiClemente, R., Salazar, L. F., ... Valois, R. F. (2011). African American adolescents and new media: Associations with HIV/STI risk behavior and psychosocial variables. Ethnicity and Disease, 21(2), 216-222.

African American adolescents and new media : Associations with HIV/STI risk behavior and psychosocial variables. / Whiteley, Laura B.; Brown, Larry K.; Swenson, Rebecca R.; Romer, Daniel; DiClemente, Ralph; Salazar, Laura F.; Vanable, Peter A.; Carey, Michael P.; Valois, Robert F.

In: Ethnicity and Disease, Vol. 21, No. 2, 01.03.2011, p. 216-222.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Whiteley, LB, Brown, LK, Swenson, RR, Romer, D, DiClemente, R, Salazar, LF, Vanable, PA, Carey, MP & Valois, RF 2011, 'African American adolescents and new media: Associations with HIV/STI risk behavior and psychosocial variables', Ethnicity and Disease, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 216-222.
Whiteley, Laura B. ; Brown, Larry K. ; Swenson, Rebecca R. ; Romer, Daniel ; DiClemente, Ralph ; Salazar, Laura F. ; Vanable, Peter A. ; Carey, Michael P. ; Valois, Robert F. / African American adolescents and new media : Associations with HIV/STI risk behavior and psychosocial variables. In: Ethnicity and Disease. 2011 ; Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 216-222.
@article{7e02f8922c5d4b45aeefde9ce4d88c22,
title = "African American adolescents and new media: Associations with HIV/STI risk behavior and psychosocial variables",
abstract = "Objectives: Cell phones and online media are used frequently but we know little about their use among African American adolescents. This study examines the frequency of such use and its relationship to psychosocial variables and STI/HIV risk behavior. Setting/Participants: 1,518 African American, aged 13-18 years, from 2 Northeast US cities (Providence, RI; Syracuse, NY) and 2 Southeast US cities (Columbia, SC; Macon, GA), were assessed from 2008-2009. Design: Participants were assessed on frequency of cell phone and Internet use, psychological constructs (ie, depression, life satisfaction, impulsivity) and HIV/STI risk behaviors (ie, history of intercourse, sexual sensation seeking attitudes, peer sexual risks norms) with reliable scales and measures using an audio computer-assisted self-interview. Results: Over 90{\%} of African American adolescents used cell phones every day or most days and 60{\%} used social networking sites every day or most days (96{\%} used Myspace). Greater frequency of cell phone use was associated with sexual sensation seeking (P=.000), riskier peer sexual norms (P=.000), and impulsivity (P=.016). Greater frequency of Internet use was associated with a history of oral/vaginal/anal sex (OR=1.03, CI=1.0-1.05) and sexual sensation seeking (P=.000). Conclusion: These findings suggest that riskier youth are online and using cell phones frequently. The Internet and cell phones may be useful platforms for targeted health promotion and prevention efforts with AA adolescents.",
keywords = "African american adolescents, Hiv/sti risk, Psychosocial",
author = "Whiteley, {Laura B.} and Brown, {Larry K.} and Swenson, {Rebecca R.} and Daniel Romer and Ralph DiClemente and Salazar, {Laura F.} and Vanable, {Peter A.} and Carey, {Michael P.} and Valois, {Robert F.}",
year = "2011",
month = "3",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "216--222",
journal = "Ethnicity and Disease",
issn = "1049-510X",
publisher = "ISHIB",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - African American adolescents and new media

T2 - Associations with HIV/STI risk behavior and psychosocial variables

AU - Whiteley, Laura B.

AU - Brown, Larry K.

AU - Swenson, Rebecca R.

AU - Romer, Daniel

AU - DiClemente, Ralph

AU - Salazar, Laura F.

AU - Vanable, Peter A.

AU - Carey, Michael P.

AU - Valois, Robert F.

PY - 2011/3/1

Y1 - 2011/3/1

N2 - Objectives: Cell phones and online media are used frequently but we know little about their use among African American adolescents. This study examines the frequency of such use and its relationship to psychosocial variables and STI/HIV risk behavior. Setting/Participants: 1,518 African American, aged 13-18 years, from 2 Northeast US cities (Providence, RI; Syracuse, NY) and 2 Southeast US cities (Columbia, SC; Macon, GA), were assessed from 2008-2009. Design: Participants were assessed on frequency of cell phone and Internet use, psychological constructs (ie, depression, life satisfaction, impulsivity) and HIV/STI risk behaviors (ie, history of intercourse, sexual sensation seeking attitudes, peer sexual risks norms) with reliable scales and measures using an audio computer-assisted self-interview. Results: Over 90% of African American adolescents used cell phones every day or most days and 60% used social networking sites every day or most days (96% used Myspace). Greater frequency of cell phone use was associated with sexual sensation seeking (P=.000), riskier peer sexual norms (P=.000), and impulsivity (P=.016). Greater frequency of Internet use was associated with a history of oral/vaginal/anal sex (OR=1.03, CI=1.0-1.05) and sexual sensation seeking (P=.000). Conclusion: These findings suggest that riskier youth are online and using cell phones frequently. The Internet and cell phones may be useful platforms for targeted health promotion and prevention efforts with AA adolescents.

AB - Objectives: Cell phones and online media are used frequently but we know little about their use among African American adolescents. This study examines the frequency of such use and its relationship to psychosocial variables and STI/HIV risk behavior. Setting/Participants: 1,518 African American, aged 13-18 years, from 2 Northeast US cities (Providence, RI; Syracuse, NY) and 2 Southeast US cities (Columbia, SC; Macon, GA), were assessed from 2008-2009. Design: Participants were assessed on frequency of cell phone and Internet use, psychological constructs (ie, depression, life satisfaction, impulsivity) and HIV/STI risk behaviors (ie, history of intercourse, sexual sensation seeking attitudes, peer sexual risks norms) with reliable scales and measures using an audio computer-assisted self-interview. Results: Over 90% of African American adolescents used cell phones every day or most days and 60% used social networking sites every day or most days (96% used Myspace). Greater frequency of cell phone use was associated with sexual sensation seeking (P=.000), riskier peer sexual norms (P=.000), and impulsivity (P=.016). Greater frequency of Internet use was associated with a history of oral/vaginal/anal sex (OR=1.03, CI=1.0-1.05) and sexual sensation seeking (P=.000). Conclusion: These findings suggest that riskier youth are online and using cell phones frequently. The Internet and cell phones may be useful platforms for targeted health promotion and prevention efforts with AA adolescents.

KW - African american adolescents

KW - Hiv/sti risk

KW - Psychosocial

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80053325388&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80053325388&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 216

EP - 222

JO - Ethnicity and Disease

JF - Ethnicity and Disease

SN - 1049-510X

IS - 2

ER -