Affect as a determinant of egotism

Residual excitation and performance attributions

Peter Gollwitzer, Walter B. Earle, Walter G. Stephan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Investigated the influence of outcome-related affect on subsequent causal attributions. After working on a social skills test, 66 male college students engaged in physical exercise. Ss were given success or failure feedback on the test 1, 5, or 9 min after the exercise. Excitation transfer theory suggests that the residual arousal from the exercise in the 5-min condition would elevate the positive and negative affective states elicited by success-failure feedback. Thus, increased attributional egotism in the 5-min condition was predicted. Findings show that Ss preferred internal factors to explain success, whereas external factors were blamed for failure. Ego-defensive attributions following failure and ego-enhancing attributions following success were more pronounced in the 5-min condition than in the other conditions. Results support the idea that outcome-related affect mediates egotistical performance attributions. (42 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)702-709
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume43
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1982

Fingerprint

attribution
Ego
Exercise
determinants
performance
Arousal
physical exercise
Students
student
Social Skills

Keywords

  • outcome-related affect, egotism in success/failure causal attributions, male college students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Affect as a determinant of egotism : Residual excitation and performance attributions. / Gollwitzer, Peter; Earle, Walter B.; Stephan, Walter G.

In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 43, No. 4, 10.1982, p. 702-709.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2cadc11545b84a9d921887de7fe347e7,
title = "Affect as a determinant of egotism: Residual excitation and performance attributions",
abstract = "Investigated the influence of outcome-related affect on subsequent causal attributions. After working on a social skills test, 66 male college students engaged in physical exercise. Ss were given success or failure feedback on the test 1, 5, or 9 min after the exercise. Excitation transfer theory suggests that the residual arousal from the exercise in the 5-min condition would elevate the positive and negative affective states elicited by success-failure feedback. Thus, increased attributional egotism in the 5-min condition was predicted. Findings show that Ss preferred internal factors to explain success, whereas external factors were blamed for failure. Ego-defensive attributions following failure and ego-enhancing attributions following success were more pronounced in the 5-min condition than in the other conditions. Results support the idea that outcome-related affect mediates egotistical performance attributions. (42 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).",
keywords = "outcome-related affect, egotism in success/failure causal attributions, male college students",
author = "Peter Gollwitzer and Earle, {Walter B.} and Stephan, {Walter G.}",
year = "1982",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1037//0022-3514.43.4.702",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "43",
pages = "702--709",
journal = "Journal of Personality and Social Psychology",
issn = "0022-3514",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Affect as a determinant of egotism

T2 - Residual excitation and performance attributions

AU - Gollwitzer, Peter

AU - Earle, Walter B.

AU - Stephan, Walter G.

PY - 1982/10

Y1 - 1982/10

N2 - Investigated the influence of outcome-related affect on subsequent causal attributions. After working on a social skills test, 66 male college students engaged in physical exercise. Ss were given success or failure feedback on the test 1, 5, or 9 min after the exercise. Excitation transfer theory suggests that the residual arousal from the exercise in the 5-min condition would elevate the positive and negative affective states elicited by success-failure feedback. Thus, increased attributional egotism in the 5-min condition was predicted. Findings show that Ss preferred internal factors to explain success, whereas external factors were blamed for failure. Ego-defensive attributions following failure and ego-enhancing attributions following success were more pronounced in the 5-min condition than in the other conditions. Results support the idea that outcome-related affect mediates egotistical performance attributions. (42 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

AB - Investigated the influence of outcome-related affect on subsequent causal attributions. After working on a social skills test, 66 male college students engaged in physical exercise. Ss were given success or failure feedback on the test 1, 5, or 9 min after the exercise. Excitation transfer theory suggests that the residual arousal from the exercise in the 5-min condition would elevate the positive and negative affective states elicited by success-failure feedback. Thus, increased attributional egotism in the 5-min condition was predicted. Findings show that Ss preferred internal factors to explain success, whereas external factors were blamed for failure. Ego-defensive attributions following failure and ego-enhancing attributions following success were more pronounced in the 5-min condition than in the other conditions. Results support the idea that outcome-related affect mediates egotistical performance attributions. (42 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

KW - outcome-related affect, egotism in success/failure causal attributions, male college students

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0040618882&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0040618882&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037//0022-3514.43.4.702

DO - 10.1037//0022-3514.43.4.702

M3 - Article

VL - 43

SP - 702

EP - 709

JO - Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

JF - Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

SN - 0022-3514

IS - 4

ER -