Adverse consequences of intimate partner abuse among women in non-urban domestic violence shelters

Gina M. Wingood, Ralph DiClemente, Anita Raj

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This study examined the health consequences of having experienced both sexual and physical abuse relative to women experiencing physical abuse but not sexual abuse. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 203 women seeking refuge in battered women's shelters. Controlling for sociodemographics, logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the consequences of experiencing both sexual and physical abuse. Results: Compared to women experiencing physical abuse, women experiencing both sexual and physical abuse were more likely to have a history of multiple sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in their abusive relationships, have had an STD in the past 2 months, be worried about being infected with HIV, use marijuana and alcohol to cope, attempt suicide, feel as though they had no control in their relationships, experience more episodes of physical abuse in the past 2 months, rate their abuse as more severe, and be physically threatened by their partner when they asked that condoms be used. Conclusions: Given the prevalence of adverse health outcomes, domestic violence shelters could counsel women to avoid using alcohol/drugs as a coping strategy, educate women about alternative healthy coping strategies, counsel women about methods of STD prevention that they can control, and provide STD screening and treatment. (C) American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)270-275
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 20 2000

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Domestic Violence
Sex Offenses
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Alcohols
Battered Women
Preventive Medicine
Health
Condoms
Cannabis
Intimate Partner Violence
Suicide
Physical Abuse
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
HIV
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Adverse consequences of intimate partner abuse among women in non-urban domestic violence shelters. / Wingood, Gina M.; DiClemente, Ralph; Raj, Anita.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 19, No. 4, 20.11.2000, p. 270-275.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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