Advancing the use of evidence-based decision-making in local health departments with systems science methodologies

Yan Li, Nan Kong, Mark Lawley, Linda Weiss, Jose Pagan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: We assessed how systems science methodologies might be used to bridge resource gaps at local health departments (LHDs) so that they might better implement evidence-based decision-making (EBDM) to address population health challenges. Methods: We used the New York Academy of Medicine Cardiovascular Health Simulation Model to evaluate the results of a hypothetical program that would reduce the proportion of people smoking, eating fewer than 5 fruits and vegetables per day, being physically active less than 150 minutes per week, and who had a body mass index (BMI) of 25 kg/m2 or greater. We used survey data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to evaluate health outcomes and validate simulation results. Results: Smoking rates and the proportion of the population with a BMI of 25 kg/m2 or greater would have decreased significantly with implementation of the hypothetical program (P < .001). Two areas would have experienced a statistically significant reduction in the local population with diabetes between 2007 and 2027 (P < .05). Conclusions: The use of systems science methodologies might be a novel and efficient way to systematically address a number of EBDM adoption barriers at LHDs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S217-S222
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume105
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

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Decision Making
Health
Body Mass Index
Smoking
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Population
Vegetables
Fruit
Eating
Medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Advancing the use of evidence-based decision-making in local health departments with systems science methodologies. / Li, Yan; Kong, Nan; Lawley, Mark; Weiss, Linda; Pagan, Jose.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 105, 01.04.2015, p. S217-S222.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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