Additive Manufacturing of Three-Phase Syntactic Foams Containing Glass Microballoons and Air Pores

Ashish Kumar Singh, Alexander J. Deptula, Rajesh Anawal, Mrityunjay Doddamani, Nikhil Gupta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

High-density polyethylene and its syntactic foams reinforced with 20 vol.% and 40 vol.% glass microballoons were 3D printed using the fused filament fabrication method and studied for their compressive response. The three-phase microstructure of syntactic foams fabricated in this work also contained about 10 vol.% matrix porosity for obtaining light weight for buoyancy applications. Filaments for 3D printing were developed using a single screw filament extruder and printed on a commercial 3D printer using settings optimized in this work. Three-dimensional printed blanks were machined to obtain specimens that were tested at 10−4 s−1, 10−3 s−1, 10−2 s−1 and 1 s−1 strain rates. The compression results were compared with those of compression-molded (CM) specimens of the same materials. It was observed that the syntactic foam had a three-phase microstructure: matrix, microballoons and air voids. The air voids made the resulting foam lighter than the CM specimen. The moduli of the 3D-printed specimen were higher than those of the CM specimens at all strain rates. Yield strength was observed to be higher for CM samples than 3D-printed ones.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJOM
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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3D printers
Syntactics
Foams
Glass
Air
Strain rate
Compaction
Microstructure
Polyethylene
Extruders
High density polyethylenes
Buoyancy
Yield stress
Printing
Porosity
Fabrication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Additive Manufacturing of Three-Phase Syntactic Foams Containing Glass Microballoons and Air Pores. / Singh, Ashish Kumar; Deptula, Alexander J.; Anawal, Rajesh; Doddamani, Mrityunjay; Gupta, Nikhil.

In: JOM, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Singh, Ashish Kumar ; Deptula, Alexander J. ; Anawal, Rajesh ; Doddamani, Mrityunjay ; Gupta, Nikhil. / Additive Manufacturing of Three-Phase Syntactic Foams Containing Glass Microballoons and Air Pores. In: JOM. 2019.
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