Added benefits: reduced depressive symptom levels among African-American female adolescents participating in an HIV prevention intervention

Jennifer L. Brown, Jessica M. Sales, Andrea L. Swartzendruber, Michael D. Eriksen, Ralph DiClemente, Eve S. Rose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Adolescents experience elevated depressive symptoms which health promotion interventions may reduce. This study investigated whether HIV prevention trial participation decreased depressive symptoms among African-American female adolescents. Adolescents (N = 701; M age = 17.6) first received a group-delivered HIV prevention intervention and then either 12 sexual health (intervention condition) or 12 general health (comparison condition) phone counseling contacts over 24 months. ACASI assessments were conducted at baseline, and at 6-, 12-, 18-, and 24-months post-baseline. Linear generalized estimating equations were used to detect percent relative change in depressive symptoms. Participants reported a 2.7 % decrease in depressive symptoms (p = 0.001) at each assessment. Intervention participants endorsed an additional 3.6 % decrease in depressive symptoms (p = 0.058). Trial participation was associated with reduced depressive symptomatology, particularly among those receiving personalized sexual health counseling. HIV prevention interventions may benefit from incorporating additional content to address adolescents’ mental health needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)912-920
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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African Americans
HIV
Depression
Reproductive Health
Counseling
Health Promotion
Mental Health
Health

Keywords

  • Adolescent women
  • African-American adolescents
  • Depression
  • Depressive symptoms
  • HIV prevention intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Added benefits : reduced depressive symptom levels among African-American female adolescents participating in an HIV prevention intervention. / Brown, Jennifer L.; Sales, Jessica M.; Swartzendruber, Andrea L.; Eriksen, Michael D.; DiClemente, Ralph; Rose, Eve S.

In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 37, No. 5, 01.01.2013, p. 912-920.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, Jennifer L. ; Sales, Jessica M. ; Swartzendruber, Andrea L. ; Eriksen, Michael D. ; DiClemente, Ralph ; Rose, Eve S. / Added benefits : reduced depressive symptom levels among African-American female adolescents participating in an HIV prevention intervention. In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 37, No. 5. pp. 912-920.
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