Acute Exercise Improves Prefrontal Cortex but not Hippocampal Function in Healthy Adults

Julia C. Basso, Andrea Shang, Meredith Elman, Ryan Karmouta, Wendy Suzuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The effects of acute aerobic exercise on cognitive functions in humans have been the subject of much investigation; however, these studies are limited by several factors, including a lack of randomized controlled designs, focus on only a single cognitive function, and testing during or shortly after exercise. Using a randomized controlled design, the present study asked how a single bout of aerobic exercise affects a range of frontal-and medial temporal lobe-dependent cognitive functions and how long these effects last. We randomly assigned 85 subjects to either a vigorous intensity acute aerobic exercise group or a video watching control group. All subjects completed a battery of cognitive tasks both before and 30, 60, 90, or 120 min after the intervention. This battery included the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised, the Modified Benton Visual Retention Test, the Stroop Color and Word Test, the Symbol Digit Modalities Test, the Digit Span Test, the Trail Making Test, and the Controlled Oral Word Association Test. Based on these measures, composite scores were formed to independently assess prefrontal cortex-and hippocampal-dependent cognition. A three-way mixed Analysis of Variance was used to determine whether differences existed between groups in the change in cognitive function from pre-to post-intervention testing. Acute exercise improved prefrontal cortex-but not hippocampal-dependent functioning, with no differences found between delay groups. Vigorous acute aerobic exercise has beneficial effects on prefrontal cortex-dependent cognition and these effects can last for up to 2 hr after exercise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)791-801
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume21
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 19 2015

Fingerprint

Prefrontal Cortex
Exercise
Cognition
cognition
Group
Word Association Tests
Trail Making Test
Stroop Test
Verbal Learning
analysis of variance
symbol
Temporal Lobe
video
Analysis of Variance
Color
Cognitive Function
lack
Control Groups
learning
Controlled

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Hippocampus
  • Learning
  • Memory
  • Plasticity
  • Prefrontal cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Acute Exercise Improves Prefrontal Cortex but not Hippocampal Function in Healthy Adults. / Basso, Julia C.; Shang, Andrea; Elman, Meredith; Karmouta, Ryan; Suzuki, Wendy.

In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Vol. 21, No. 10, 19.11.2015, p. 791-801.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Basso, Julia C. ; Shang, Andrea ; Elman, Meredith ; Karmouta, Ryan ; Suzuki, Wendy. / Acute Exercise Improves Prefrontal Cortex but not Hippocampal Function in Healthy Adults. In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society. 2015 ; Vol. 21, No. 10. pp. 791-801.
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