Active living and social justice

Planning for physical activity in low-income, Black, and Latino communities

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The U.S. faces rising rates of overweight and obesity. Active living - urban planning and design to promote physical activity - has emerged as a strategy to combat growing obesity. The active living movement initially targeted mostly middle-class, suburban communities. In this article, I argue that planning for active living must especially address low-income, Black, and Latino communities, where obesity and related health risks are greatest and resources least available. First I review the problem of obesity and related health conditions among low-income, Black, and Latino populations in the U.S., and identify the role of insufficient physical activity in this problem. I then examine physical environment and other factors that shape opportunities for physical activity in low-income communities and communities of color. Finally, I identify strategies that may help to promote active living in urban settings to better serve these communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-99
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the American Planning Association
Volume72
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006

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physical activity
obesity
social justice
low income
income
planning
community
urban design
urban planning
health risk
middle class
resource
health
resources

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

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abstract = "The U.S. faces rising rates of overweight and obesity. Active living - urban planning and design to promote physical activity - has emerged as a strategy to combat growing obesity. The active living movement initially targeted mostly middle-class, suburban communities. In this article, I argue that planning for active living must especially address low-income, Black, and Latino communities, where obesity and related health risks are greatest and resources least available. First I review the problem of obesity and related health conditions among low-income, Black, and Latino populations in the U.S., and identify the role of insufficient physical activity in this problem. I then examine physical environment and other factors that shape opportunities for physical activity in low-income communities and communities of color. Finally, I identify strategies that may help to promote active living in urban settings to better serve these communities.",
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