Accuracy of self-reported smoking abstinence in clinical trials of hospital-initiated smoking interventions

the Consortium of Hospitals Advancing Research on Tobacco (CHART)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aims: To estimate the prevalence and predictors of failed biochemical verification of self-reported abstinence among participants enrolled in trials of hospital-initiated smoking cessation interventions. Design: Comparison of characteristics between participants who verified and those who failed to verify self-reported abstinence. Settings: Multi-site randomized clinical trials conducted between 2010 and 2014 in hospitals throughout the United States. Participants: Recently hospitalized smokers who reported tobacco abstinence 6 months post-randomization and provided a saliva sample for verification purposes (n = 822). Measurements: Outcomes were salivary cotinine-verified smoking abstinence at 10 and 15 ng/ml cut-points. Predictors and correlates included participant demographics and tobacco use; hospital diagnoses and treatment; and study characteristics collected via surveys and electronic medical records. Findings: Usable samples were returned by 69.8% of the 1178 eligible trial participants who reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence. The proportion of participants verified as quit was 57.8% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 54.4, 61.2; 10 ng/ml cut-off] or 60.6% (95% CI = 57.2, 63.9; 15 ng/ml). Factors associated independently with verification at 10 ng/ml were education beyond high school education [odds ratio (OR) = 1.51; 95% CI = 1.07, 2.11], continuous abstinence since hospitalization (OR = 2.82; 95% CI = 2.02, 3.94), mailed versus in-person sample (OR = 3.20; 95% CI = 1.96, 5.21) and race. African American participants were less likely to verify abstinence than white participants (OR = 0.64; 95% CI = 0.44, 0.93). Findings were similar for verification at 15 ng/ml. Verification rates did not differ by treatment group. Conclusions: In the United States, high rates (40%) of recently hospitalized smokers enrolled in smoking cessation trials fail biochemical verification of their self-reported abstinence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2227-2236
Number of pages10
JournalAddiction
Volume112
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

Smoking
Clinical Trials
Confidence Intervals
Odds Ratio
Smoking Cessation
Education
Cotinine
Electronic Health Records
Tobacco Use
Random Allocation
Saliva
African Americans
Tobacco
Hospitalization
Randomized Controlled Trials
Demography
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Biochemical verification
  • hospital patients
  • saliva cotinine
  • self-report
  • smoking cessation
  • trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Accuracy of self-reported smoking abstinence in clinical trials of hospital-initiated smoking interventions. / the Consortium of Hospitals Advancing Research on Tobacco (CHART).

In: Addiction, Vol. 112, No. 12, 01.12.2017, p. 2227-2236.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

the Consortium of Hospitals Advancing Research on Tobacco (CHART) 2017, 'Accuracy of self-reported smoking abstinence in clinical trials of hospital-initiated smoking interventions', Addiction, vol. 112, no. 12, pp. 2227-2236. https://doi.org/10.1111/add.13913
the Consortium of Hospitals Advancing Research on Tobacco (CHART). Accuracy of self-reported smoking abstinence in clinical trials of hospital-initiated smoking interventions. Addiction. 2017 Dec 1;112(12):2227-2236. https://doi.org/10.1111/add.13913
the Consortium of Hospitals Advancing Research on Tobacco (CHART). / Accuracy of self-reported smoking abstinence in clinical trials of hospital-initiated smoking interventions. In: Addiction. 2017 ; Vol. 112, No. 12. pp. 2227-2236.
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abstract = "Aims: To estimate the prevalence and predictors of failed biochemical verification of self-reported abstinence among participants enrolled in trials of hospital-initiated smoking cessation interventions. Design: Comparison of characteristics between participants who verified and those who failed to verify self-reported abstinence. Settings: Multi-site randomized clinical trials conducted between 2010 and 2014 in hospitals throughout the United States. Participants: Recently hospitalized smokers who reported tobacco abstinence 6 months post-randomization and provided a saliva sample for verification purposes (n = 822). Measurements: Outcomes were salivary cotinine-verified smoking abstinence at 10 and 15 ng/ml cut-points. Predictors and correlates included participant demographics and tobacco use; hospital diagnoses and treatment; and study characteristics collected via surveys and electronic medical records. Findings: Usable samples were returned by 69.8{\%} of the 1178 eligible trial participants who reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence. The proportion of participants verified as quit was 57.8{\%} [95{\%} confidence interval (CI) = 54.4, 61.2; 10 ng/ml cut-off] or 60.6{\%} (95{\%} CI = 57.2, 63.9; 15 ng/ml). Factors associated independently with verification at 10 ng/ml were education beyond high school education [odds ratio (OR) = 1.51; 95{\%} CI = 1.07, 2.11], continuous abstinence since hospitalization (OR = 2.82; 95{\%} CI = 2.02, 3.94), mailed versus in-person sample (OR = 3.20; 95{\%} CI = 1.96, 5.21) and race. African American participants were less likely to verify abstinence than white participants (OR = 0.64; 95{\%} CI = 0.44, 0.93). Findings were similar for verification at 15 ng/ml. Verification rates did not differ by treatment group. Conclusions: In the United States, high rates (40{\%}) of recently hospitalized smokers enrolled in smoking cessation trials fail biochemical verification of their self-reported abstinence.",
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author = "{the Consortium of Hospitals Advancing Research on Tobacco (CHART)} and Scheuermann, {Taneisha S.} and Richter, {Kimber P.} and Rigotti, {Nancy A.} and Cummins, {Sharon E.} and Harrington, {Kathleen F.} and Scott Sherman and Zhu, {Shu Hong} and Tindle, {Hilary A.} and Preacher, {Kristopher J.}",
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AU - Scheuermann, Taneisha S.

AU - Richter, Kimber P.

AU - Rigotti, Nancy A.

AU - Cummins, Sharon E.

AU - Harrington, Kathleen F.

AU - Sherman, Scott

AU - Zhu, Shu Hong

AU - Tindle, Hilary A.

AU - Preacher, Kristopher J.

PY - 2017/12/1

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N2 - Aims: To estimate the prevalence and predictors of failed biochemical verification of self-reported abstinence among participants enrolled in trials of hospital-initiated smoking cessation interventions. Design: Comparison of characteristics between participants who verified and those who failed to verify self-reported abstinence. Settings: Multi-site randomized clinical trials conducted between 2010 and 2014 in hospitals throughout the United States. Participants: Recently hospitalized smokers who reported tobacco abstinence 6 months post-randomization and provided a saliva sample for verification purposes (n = 822). Measurements: Outcomes were salivary cotinine-verified smoking abstinence at 10 and 15 ng/ml cut-points. Predictors and correlates included participant demographics and tobacco use; hospital diagnoses and treatment; and study characteristics collected via surveys and electronic medical records. Findings: Usable samples were returned by 69.8% of the 1178 eligible trial participants who reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence. The proportion of participants verified as quit was 57.8% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 54.4, 61.2; 10 ng/ml cut-off] or 60.6% (95% CI = 57.2, 63.9; 15 ng/ml). Factors associated independently with verification at 10 ng/ml were education beyond high school education [odds ratio (OR) = 1.51; 95% CI = 1.07, 2.11], continuous abstinence since hospitalization (OR = 2.82; 95% CI = 2.02, 3.94), mailed versus in-person sample (OR = 3.20; 95% CI = 1.96, 5.21) and race. African American participants were less likely to verify abstinence than white participants (OR = 0.64; 95% CI = 0.44, 0.93). Findings were similar for verification at 15 ng/ml. Verification rates did not differ by treatment group. Conclusions: In the United States, high rates (40%) of recently hospitalized smokers enrolled in smoking cessation trials fail biochemical verification of their self-reported abstinence.

AB - Aims: To estimate the prevalence and predictors of failed biochemical verification of self-reported abstinence among participants enrolled in trials of hospital-initiated smoking cessation interventions. Design: Comparison of characteristics between participants who verified and those who failed to verify self-reported abstinence. Settings: Multi-site randomized clinical trials conducted between 2010 and 2014 in hospitals throughout the United States. Participants: Recently hospitalized smokers who reported tobacco abstinence 6 months post-randomization and provided a saliva sample for verification purposes (n = 822). Measurements: Outcomes were salivary cotinine-verified smoking abstinence at 10 and 15 ng/ml cut-points. Predictors and correlates included participant demographics and tobacco use; hospital diagnoses and treatment; and study characteristics collected via surveys and electronic medical records. Findings: Usable samples were returned by 69.8% of the 1178 eligible trial participants who reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence. The proportion of participants verified as quit was 57.8% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 54.4, 61.2; 10 ng/ml cut-off] or 60.6% (95% CI = 57.2, 63.9; 15 ng/ml). Factors associated independently with verification at 10 ng/ml were education beyond high school education [odds ratio (OR) = 1.51; 95% CI = 1.07, 2.11], continuous abstinence since hospitalization (OR = 2.82; 95% CI = 2.02, 3.94), mailed versus in-person sample (OR = 3.20; 95% CI = 1.96, 5.21) and race. African American participants were less likely to verify abstinence than white participants (OR = 0.64; 95% CI = 0.44, 0.93). Findings were similar for verification at 15 ng/ml. Verification rates did not differ by treatment group. Conclusions: In the United States, high rates (40%) of recently hospitalized smokers enrolled in smoking cessation trials fail biochemical verification of their self-reported abstinence.

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KW - hospital patients

KW - saliva cotinine

KW - self-report

KW - smoking cessation

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