Access to institutional resources as a measure of social exclusion: relations with family process and cognitive development in the context of immigration.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Few studies have examined how experiences associated with being an undocumented immigrant parent affects children's development. In this article, the authors apply social exclusion theory to examine how access to institutional resources that require identification may matter for parents and children in immigrant families. As hypothesized, groups with higher proportions of undocumented parents in New York City (e.g., Mexicans compared to Dominicans) reported lower levels of access to checking accounts, savings accounts, credit, and drivers' licenses. Lack of access to such resources, in turn, was associated with higher economic hardship and psychological distress among parents, and lower levels of cognitive ability in their 24-month-old children. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-86
Number of pages24
JournalNew Directions for Child and Adolescent Development
Volume2008
Issue number121
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

Fingerprint

Emigration and Immigration
Parents
Aptitude
Licensure
Child Development
Economics
Psychology
Personal Banking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{a11ffeed368a45d5afd955bdcaf1dada,
title = "Access to institutional resources as a measure of social exclusion: relations with family process and cognitive development in the context of immigration.",
abstract = "Few studies have examined how experiences associated with being an undocumented immigrant parent affects children's development. In this article, the authors apply social exclusion theory to examine how access to institutional resources that require identification may matter for parents and children in immigrant families. As hypothesized, groups with higher proportions of undocumented parents in New York City (e.g., Mexicans compared to Dominicans) reported lower levels of access to checking accounts, savings accounts, credit, and drivers' licenses. Lack of access to such resources, in turn, was associated with higher economic hardship and psychological distress among parents, and lower levels of cognitive ability in their 24-month-old children. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.",
author = "Hirokazu Yoshikawa and Godfrey, {Erin B.} and Rivera, {Ann C.}",
year = "2008",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1002/cd.223",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2008",
pages = "63--86",
journal = "New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development",
issn = "1520-3247",
publisher = "Jossey-Bass Inc.",
number = "121",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Access to institutional resources as a measure of social exclusion

T2 - relations with family process and cognitive development in the context of immigration.

AU - Yoshikawa, Hirokazu

AU - Godfrey, Erin B.

AU - Rivera, Ann C.

PY - 2008/9

Y1 - 2008/9

N2 - Few studies have examined how experiences associated with being an undocumented immigrant parent affects children's development. In this article, the authors apply social exclusion theory to examine how access to institutional resources that require identification may matter for parents and children in immigrant families. As hypothesized, groups with higher proportions of undocumented parents in New York City (e.g., Mexicans compared to Dominicans) reported lower levels of access to checking accounts, savings accounts, credit, and drivers' licenses. Lack of access to such resources, in turn, was associated with higher economic hardship and psychological distress among parents, and lower levels of cognitive ability in their 24-month-old children. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

AB - Few studies have examined how experiences associated with being an undocumented immigrant parent affects children's development. In this article, the authors apply social exclusion theory to examine how access to institutional resources that require identification may matter for parents and children in immigrant families. As hypothesized, groups with higher proportions of undocumented parents in New York City (e.g., Mexicans compared to Dominicans) reported lower levels of access to checking accounts, savings accounts, credit, and drivers' licenses. Lack of access to such resources, in turn, was associated with higher economic hardship and psychological distress among parents, and lower levels of cognitive ability in their 24-month-old children. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=58149398571&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=58149398571&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/cd.223

DO - 10.1002/cd.223

M3 - Article

C2 - 18792950

AN - SCOPUS:58149398571

VL - 2008

SP - 63

EP - 86

JO - New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development

JF - New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development

SN - 1520-3247

IS - 121

ER -