Access to finance

Dean Karlan, Jonathan Morduch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Expanding access to financial services holds the promise to help reduce poverty and spur economic development. But, as a practical matter, commercial banks have faced challenges expanding access to poor and low-income households in developing economies, and nonprofits have had limited reach. We review recent innovations that are improving the quantity and quality of financial access. They are taking possibilities well beyond early models centered on providing "microcredit" for small business investment. We focus on new credit mechanisms and devices that help households manage cash flows, save, and cope with risk. Our eye is on contract designs, product innovations, regulatory policy, and ultimately economic and social impacts. We relate the innovations and empirical evidence to theoretical ideas, drawing links in particular to new work in behavioral economics and to randomized evaluation methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4703-4784
Number of pages82
JournalHandbook of Development Economics
Volume5
Issue numberC
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Fingerprint

finance
innovation
financial services
regulatory policy
product design
financial service
social impact
household income
small business
economic impact
social effects
economics
poverty
credit
bank
economic development
low income
economy
evaluation
evidence

Keywords

  • Behavioral economics
  • Credit savings
  • Economic growth
  • Financial intermediation
  • Insurance
  • Microcredit
  • Microfinance
  • Microinsurance
  • Randomized controlled trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Access to finance. / Karlan, Dean; Morduch, Jonathan.

In: Handbook of Development Economics, Vol. 5, No. C, 2010, p. 4703-4784.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Karlan, Dean ; Morduch, Jonathan. / Access to finance. In: Handbook of Development Economics. 2010 ; Vol. 5, No. C. pp. 4703-4784.
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