Acceptance of and experiences utilising expedited partner therapy among African-American juvenile girls

Ja Nelle M. Ricks, Andrea L. Swartzendruber, Jessica M. Sales, Lorin S. Boyce, Ralph J. Diclemente, Eve Rose

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Abstract

Background The aim of this study was to describe acceptance of and experiences utilising expedited partner therapy (EPT) among African-American girls recruited from short-term juvenile detention centres. Methods: Ninety-five detained African-American girls (aged 13-17 years) completed audio computer-assisted self-interviews (ACASI) and self-collected vaginal swab specimens assayed for chlamydia and gonorrhoea. EPT was offered to sexually transmissible infection (STI)-positive participants (n≤51); follow-up phone interviews assessed medication delivery to partners. Summary statistics described EPT acceptance frequency. Generalised estimating equations assessed correlates of acceptance. Nine semi-structured interviews elicited EPT experiences. Results: EPT was offered 69 times, accepted by 70% (n≤37) girls and provided to 68% (n≤36) of girls. Acceptance was significantly associated with sexual risk behaviours such as infrequent partner STI prevention discussion (OR≤3.2, 95% CI: 1.0,-10.1, P≤0.048) and≥4 lifetime sex partners (OR≤3.3, 95% CI: 1.0-11.0, P≤0.048). Discontinued relationships were the most common barrier to EPT acceptance. Emergent interview themes included sense of responsibility, which appeared to motivate acceptance and help overcome identified discomfort with partner disclosure conversations. Conclusions: Future research is needed to determine EPT efficacy among African-American juvenile populations and feasibility of its use outside of research settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)364-368
Number of pages5
JournalSexual Health
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Keywords

  • partner notification
  • urban youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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