Acceptability of smartphone text- and voice-based ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods among low income housing residents in New York City

Dustin Duncan, William C. Goedel, James H. Williams, Brian D. Elbel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the acceptability of smartphone-based text message- and voice-based ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods among a sample of low-income housing residents in New York City. Using data from the community-based NYC Low Income Housing, Neighborhoods and Health Study (n = 112), the acceptability of text message- and voice-based EMA methods were assessed via survey. Results: Overall, 88.4% of participants reported that they would participate in a study that utilized text message-based EMA. These analyses showed no appreciable differences by sub-groups (p >.05). Overall, 80.2% of participants reported that they would participate in a study that used voice-based EMA. This voice-based method was least acceptable among participants younger than 25 years old compared to participants of all other ages, χ2(2) = 10.107, p =.006 (among the younger participants 60.7% reported "yes" regarding the anticipated acceptability of voice-based EMA and 39.3% reported "no"). Overall, this work suggests that text message- and voice-based EMA methods are acceptable for use among low-income housing residents. However, the association between age and the acceptability of voice-based EMA suggests that these methods may be less suited for younger populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number517
JournalBMC Research Notes
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 26 2017

Fingerprint

Smartphones
Text Messaging
Smartphone
Ecological Momentary Assessment
Health
Population

Keywords

  • Acceptability
  • Ecological momentary assessment (EMA)
  • Health disparities
  • Low income populations
  • Public housing residents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Acceptability of smartphone text- and voice-based ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods among low income housing residents in New York City. / Duncan, Dustin; Goedel, William C.; Williams, James H.; Elbel, Brian D.

In: BMC Research Notes, Vol. 10, No. 1, 517, 26.10.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5feed52993e245d28e591551a142b7fb,
title = "Acceptability of smartphone text- and voice-based ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods among low income housing residents in New York City",
abstract = "Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the acceptability of smartphone-based text message- and voice-based ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods among a sample of low-income housing residents in New York City. Using data from the community-based NYC Low Income Housing, Neighborhoods and Health Study (n = 112), the acceptability of text message- and voice-based EMA methods were assessed via survey. Results: Overall, 88.4{\%} of participants reported that they would participate in a study that utilized text message-based EMA. These analyses showed no appreciable differences by sub-groups (p >.05). Overall, 80.2{\%} of participants reported that they would participate in a study that used voice-based EMA. This voice-based method was least acceptable among participants younger than 25 years old compared to participants of all other ages, χ2(2) = 10.107, p =.006 (among the younger participants 60.7{\%} reported {"}yes{"} regarding the anticipated acceptability of voice-based EMA and 39.3{\%} reported {"}no{"}). Overall, this work suggests that text message- and voice-based EMA methods are acceptable for use among low-income housing residents. However, the association between age and the acceptability of voice-based EMA suggests that these methods may be less suited for younger populations.",
keywords = "Acceptability, Ecological momentary assessment (EMA), Health disparities, Low income populations, Public housing residents",
author = "Dustin Duncan and Goedel, {William C.} and Williams, {James H.} and Elbel, {Brian D.}",
year = "2017",
month = "10",
day = "26",
doi = "10.1186/s13104-017-2850-z",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
journal = "BMC Research Notes",
issn = "1756-0500",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acceptability of smartphone text- and voice-based ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods among low income housing residents in New York City

AU - Duncan, Dustin

AU - Goedel, William C.

AU - Williams, James H.

AU - Elbel, Brian D.

PY - 2017/10/26

Y1 - 2017/10/26

N2 - Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the acceptability of smartphone-based text message- and voice-based ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods among a sample of low-income housing residents in New York City. Using data from the community-based NYC Low Income Housing, Neighborhoods and Health Study (n = 112), the acceptability of text message- and voice-based EMA methods were assessed via survey. Results: Overall, 88.4% of participants reported that they would participate in a study that utilized text message-based EMA. These analyses showed no appreciable differences by sub-groups (p >.05). Overall, 80.2% of participants reported that they would participate in a study that used voice-based EMA. This voice-based method was least acceptable among participants younger than 25 years old compared to participants of all other ages, χ2(2) = 10.107, p =.006 (among the younger participants 60.7% reported "yes" regarding the anticipated acceptability of voice-based EMA and 39.3% reported "no"). Overall, this work suggests that text message- and voice-based EMA methods are acceptable for use among low-income housing residents. However, the association between age and the acceptability of voice-based EMA suggests that these methods may be less suited for younger populations.

AB - Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the acceptability of smartphone-based text message- and voice-based ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods among a sample of low-income housing residents in New York City. Using data from the community-based NYC Low Income Housing, Neighborhoods and Health Study (n = 112), the acceptability of text message- and voice-based EMA methods were assessed via survey. Results: Overall, 88.4% of participants reported that they would participate in a study that utilized text message-based EMA. These analyses showed no appreciable differences by sub-groups (p >.05). Overall, 80.2% of participants reported that they would participate in a study that used voice-based EMA. This voice-based method was least acceptable among participants younger than 25 years old compared to participants of all other ages, χ2(2) = 10.107, p =.006 (among the younger participants 60.7% reported "yes" regarding the anticipated acceptability of voice-based EMA and 39.3% reported "no"). Overall, this work suggests that text message- and voice-based EMA methods are acceptable for use among low-income housing residents. However, the association between age and the acceptability of voice-based EMA suggests that these methods may be less suited for younger populations.

KW - Acceptability

KW - Ecological momentary assessment (EMA)

KW - Health disparities

KW - Low income populations

KW - Public housing residents

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85032356714&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85032356714&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s13104-017-2850-z

DO - 10.1186/s13104-017-2850-z

M3 - Article

C2 - 29073921

AN - SCOPUS:85032356714

VL - 10

JO - BMC Research Notes

JF - BMC Research Notes

SN - 1756-0500

IS - 1

M1 - 517

ER -