Abandonment and Expansion of Arable Land in Europe

Erez Hatna, Martha M. Bakker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Abandonment of arable land is often assumed to happen mostly in marginal areas where the conditions for arable cultivation are relatively unfavorable, whereas arable expansion is expected to occur mostly in areas with favorable conditions. This assumption, used in many land-use change forecasts, was never properly tested, mainly because the relatively short period of full-coverage land-use inventories did not allow a systematic analysis of the phenomena. With the recent release of CORINE 2006 this has changed. In this article, we explore the typical locations of abandonment and expansion of arable land in Europe during the period 1990-2006 by means of logistic regressions. More specifically, we test whether or not locations of abandonment and expansion can be inferred from the location characteristics of arable land in 1990. If the above assumption holds, this should be the case. We demonstrate that although arable expansion indeed happens in locations that resemble the bulk of arable land in 1990 (the presumably favorable locations), arable abandonment does not necessarily happen in locations that resemble the bulk of uncultivated land (that is, the presumably unfavorable locations). In other words, the assumption does not hold. Particularly, areas close to the road network were found to be associated with both high abandonment rates and high expansion rates, which suggest that abandonment is not limited to areas that are marginal in terms of agricultural production.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)720-731
Number of pages12
JournalEcosystems
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

Fingerprint

arable land
arable soils
Land use
land use change
agricultural production
roads
logistics
land use
Plant expansion
agriculture
Europe
Logistics
testing
rate

Keywords

  • agriculture
  • cropland
  • Europe
  • land abandonment
  • land-use change

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Abandonment and Expansion of Arable Land in Europe. / Hatna, Erez; Bakker, Martha M.

In: Ecosystems, Vol. 14, No. 5, 08.2011, p. 720-731.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hatna, Erez ; Bakker, Martha M. / Abandonment and Expansion of Arable Land in Europe. In: Ecosystems. 2011 ; Vol. 14, No. 5. pp. 720-731.
@article{69a410feda6843188985c579d7c0b0f2,
title = "Abandonment and Expansion of Arable Land in Europe",
abstract = "Abandonment of arable land is often assumed to happen mostly in marginal areas where the conditions for arable cultivation are relatively unfavorable, whereas arable expansion is expected to occur mostly in areas with favorable conditions. This assumption, used in many land-use change forecasts, was never properly tested, mainly because the relatively short period of full-coverage land-use inventories did not allow a systematic analysis of the phenomena. With the recent release of CORINE 2006 this has changed. In this article, we explore the typical locations of abandonment and expansion of arable land in Europe during the period 1990-2006 by means of logistic regressions. More specifically, we test whether or not locations of abandonment and expansion can be inferred from the location characteristics of arable land in 1990. If the above assumption holds, this should be the case. We demonstrate that although arable expansion indeed happens in locations that resemble the bulk of arable land in 1990 (the presumably favorable locations), arable abandonment does not necessarily happen in locations that resemble the bulk of uncultivated land (that is, the presumably unfavorable locations). In other words, the assumption does not hold. Particularly, areas close to the road network were found to be associated with both high abandonment rates and high expansion rates, which suggest that abandonment is not limited to areas that are marginal in terms of agricultural production.",
keywords = "agriculture, cropland, Europe, land abandonment, land-use change",
author = "Erez Hatna and Bakker, {Martha M.}",
year = "2011",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1007/s10021-011-9441-y",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "720--731",
journal = "Ecosystems",
issn = "1432-9840",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Abandonment and Expansion of Arable Land in Europe

AU - Hatna, Erez

AU - Bakker, Martha M.

PY - 2011/8

Y1 - 2011/8

N2 - Abandonment of arable land is often assumed to happen mostly in marginal areas where the conditions for arable cultivation are relatively unfavorable, whereas arable expansion is expected to occur mostly in areas with favorable conditions. This assumption, used in many land-use change forecasts, was never properly tested, mainly because the relatively short period of full-coverage land-use inventories did not allow a systematic analysis of the phenomena. With the recent release of CORINE 2006 this has changed. In this article, we explore the typical locations of abandonment and expansion of arable land in Europe during the period 1990-2006 by means of logistic regressions. More specifically, we test whether or not locations of abandonment and expansion can be inferred from the location characteristics of arable land in 1990. If the above assumption holds, this should be the case. We demonstrate that although arable expansion indeed happens in locations that resemble the bulk of arable land in 1990 (the presumably favorable locations), arable abandonment does not necessarily happen in locations that resemble the bulk of uncultivated land (that is, the presumably unfavorable locations). In other words, the assumption does not hold. Particularly, areas close to the road network were found to be associated with both high abandonment rates and high expansion rates, which suggest that abandonment is not limited to areas that are marginal in terms of agricultural production.

AB - Abandonment of arable land is often assumed to happen mostly in marginal areas where the conditions for arable cultivation are relatively unfavorable, whereas arable expansion is expected to occur mostly in areas with favorable conditions. This assumption, used in many land-use change forecasts, was never properly tested, mainly because the relatively short period of full-coverage land-use inventories did not allow a systematic analysis of the phenomena. With the recent release of CORINE 2006 this has changed. In this article, we explore the typical locations of abandonment and expansion of arable land in Europe during the period 1990-2006 by means of logistic regressions. More specifically, we test whether or not locations of abandonment and expansion can be inferred from the location characteristics of arable land in 1990. If the above assumption holds, this should be the case. We demonstrate that although arable expansion indeed happens in locations that resemble the bulk of arable land in 1990 (the presumably favorable locations), arable abandonment does not necessarily happen in locations that resemble the bulk of uncultivated land (that is, the presumably unfavorable locations). In other words, the assumption does not hold. Particularly, areas close to the road network were found to be associated with both high abandonment rates and high expansion rates, which suggest that abandonment is not limited to areas that are marginal in terms of agricultural production.

KW - agriculture

KW - cropland

KW - Europe

KW - land abandonment

KW - land-use change

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79960291273&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79960291273&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10021-011-9441-y

DO - 10.1007/s10021-011-9441-y

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 720

EP - 731

JO - Ecosystems

JF - Ecosystems

SN - 1432-9840

IS - 5

ER -