A taxonomy of nursing care organization models in hospitals

Carl Ardy Dubois, Danielle Damour, Eric Tchouaket, Michèle Rivard, Sean Clarke, Régis Blais

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Abstract. Background: Over the last decades, converging forces in hospital care, including cost-containment policies, rising healthcare demands and nursing shortages, have driven the search for new operational models of nursing care delivery that maximize the use of available nursing resources while ensuring safe, high-quality care. Little is known, however, about the distinctive features of these emergent nursing care models. This article contributes to filling this gap by presenting a theoretically and empirically grounded taxonomy of nursing care organization models in the context of acute care units in Quebec and comparing their distinctive features. Methods. This study was based on a survey of 22 medical units in 11 acute care facilities in Quebec. Data collection methods included questionnaire, interviews, focus groups and administrative data census. The analytical procedures consisted of first generating unit profiles based on qualitative and quantitative data collected at the unit level, then applying hierarchical cluster analysis to the units profile data. Results: The study identified four models of nursing care organization: two professional models that draw mainly on registered nurses as professionals to deliver nursing services and reflect stronger support to nurses professional practice, and two functional models that draw more significantly on licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and assistive staff (orderlies) to deliver nursing services and are characterized by registered nurses perceptions that the practice environment is less supportive of their professional work. Conclusions: This study showed that medical units in acute care hospitals exhibit diverse staff mixes, patterns of skill use, work environment design, and support for innovation. The four models reflect not only distinct approaches to dealing with the numerous constraints in the nursing care environment, but also different degrees of approximations to an ideal nursing professional practice model described by some leaders in the contemporary nursing literature. While the two professional models appear closer to this ideal, the two functional models are farther removed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number286
JournalBMC Health Services Research
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 30 2012

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Nursing Care
Organizations
Nursing
Nursing Services
Professional Practice
Quebec
Nurses
Environment Design
Nursing Models
Cost Control
Quality of Health Care
Censuses
Focus Groups
Cluster Analysis
Interviews
Delivery of Health Care
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

A taxonomy of nursing care organization models in hospitals. / Dubois, Carl Ardy; Damour, Danielle; Tchouaket, Eric; Rivard, Michèle; Clarke, Sean; Blais, Régis.

In: BMC Health Services Research, Vol. 12, No. 1, 286, 30.08.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dubois, Carl Ardy ; Damour, Danielle ; Tchouaket, Eric ; Rivard, Michèle ; Clarke, Sean ; Blais, Régis. / A taxonomy of nursing care organization models in hospitals. In: BMC Health Services Research. 2012 ; Vol. 12, No. 1.
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