A systematic review of strategies for partner notification for sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS

C. Mathews, N. Coetzee, M. Zwarenstein, C. Lombard, Sally Guttmacher, A. Oxman, G. Schmid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This review compares the effects of various sexually transmitted disease (STD) partner-notification strategies. Using review methods endorsed by the Cochrane Collaboration, it updates previous reviews, and addresses some of their methodological limitations. It includes 11 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing two or more strategies, including 8014 participants. Only two trials were conducted in developing countries, and only two trials were conducted among HIV-positive patients. The review found moderately strong evidence that: (1) provider referral alone, or the choice between patient and provider referral, when compared with patient referral among patients with HIV or any STD, increases the rate of partners presenting for medical evaluation; (2) contract referral, when compared with patient referral among patients with gonorrhoea, results in more partners presenting for medical evaluation; (3) verbal, nurse-given health education together with patient-centred counselling by lay workers, when compared with standard care among patients with any STD, results in small increases in the rate of partners treated. The review concludes that there is a need for evaluations of interventions combining provider training and patient education, for evaluations conducted in developing countries, and for the measurement of potential harmful effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)285-300
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of STD and AIDS
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Contact Tracing
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
HIV
Referral and Consultation
Developing Countries
Disease Notification
Gonorrhea
Patient Education
Contracts
Health Education
Counseling
Patient Care
Randomized Controlled Trials
Nurses

Keywords

  • Partner notification
  • Sexually transmitted diseases
  • Systematic review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Immunology

Cite this

A systematic review of strategies for partner notification for sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS. / Mathews, C.; Coetzee, N.; Zwarenstein, M.; Lombard, C.; Guttmacher, Sally; Oxman, A.; Schmid, G.

In: International Journal of STD and AIDS, Vol. 13, No. 5, 2002, p. 285-300.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mathews, C. ; Coetzee, N. ; Zwarenstein, M. ; Lombard, C. ; Guttmacher, Sally ; Oxman, A. ; Schmid, G. / A systematic review of strategies for partner notification for sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS. In: International Journal of STD and AIDS. 2002 ; Vol. 13, No. 5. pp. 285-300.
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