A systematic review of outcomes of maternal weight gain according to the Institute of Medicine recommendations

birthweight, fetal growth, and postpartum weight retention

Anna Maria Siega-Riz, Meera Viswanathan, Merry K. Moos, Andrea Deierlein, Sunni Mumford, Julie Knaack, Patricia Thieda, Linda J. Lux, Kathleen N. Lohr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This systematic review focuses on outcomes of gestational weight gain, specifically birthweight, fetal growth, and postpartum weight retention, for singleton pregnancies with respect to the 1990 Institute of Medicine weight gain recommendations. A total of 35 studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. There was strong evidence to support associations between excessive gestational weight gain and increased birthweight and fetal growth (large for gestational age) as well as inadequate gestational weight gain and decreased birthweight and fetal growth (small for gestational age). There was moderate evidence to support the association between excessive gestational weight gain and postpartum weight retention. Clear clinical recommendations based on this review are challenging because of several limitations in the literature. Improvements in future research include the use of consistent definitions of gestational weight gain and outcomes of interest, assessment of confounders, and better collection of weight and weight gain data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume201
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2009

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National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (U.S.) Health and Medicine Division
Fetal Development
Postpartum Period
Weight Gain
Mothers
Weights and Measures
Gestational Age
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pregnancy

Keywords

  • birthweight
  • fetal growth
  • maternal weight gain
  • postpartum weight retention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

A systematic review of outcomes of maternal weight gain according to the Institute of Medicine recommendations : birthweight, fetal growth, and postpartum weight retention. / Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Viswanathan, Meera; Moos, Merry K.; Deierlein, Andrea; Mumford, Sunni; Knaack, Julie; Thieda, Patricia; Lux, Linda J.; Lohr, Kathleen N.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 201, No. 4, 10.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Siega-Riz, Anna Maria ; Viswanathan, Meera ; Moos, Merry K. ; Deierlein, Andrea ; Mumford, Sunni ; Knaack, Julie ; Thieda, Patricia ; Lux, Linda J. ; Lohr, Kathleen N. / A systematic review of outcomes of maternal weight gain according to the Institute of Medicine recommendations : birthweight, fetal growth, and postpartum weight retention. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2009 ; Vol. 201, No. 4.
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