A stochastic theory of community food webs. I. Models and aggregated data.

J. E. Cohen, Charles Newman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Three recently discovered quantitative empirical generalizations describe major features of the structure of community food webs: 1) a species scaling law: the mean proportions of basal, intermediate and top species remain invariant at c0.19, 0.53 and 0.29, respectively, over the range of variation in the number of species in a web; 2) a link scaling law: the mean proportions of trophic links in the categories basal-intermediate, basal-top, intermediate-intermediate, and intermediate-top remain invariant at c0.27. 0.08, 0.30 and 0.35, respectively, over the range of variation in the number of trophic links to species remains invariant at c1.86, over the range of variation in the number of species in a web. This paper presents a model, the only successful one among several attempts, in which the first 2 of these empirical generalizations can be derived as a consequence of the 3rd. The model assumes that species are ordered in a cascade or hierarchy such that a given species can prey on only those species below it and can be preyed on by only those species above it in the hierarchy.-Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - Royal Society of London, Series B
Pages421-448
Number of pages28
Volume224
Edition1237
StatePublished - 1985

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food web

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Cohen, J. E., & Newman, C. (1985). A stochastic theory of community food webs. I. Models and aggregated data. In Proceedings - Royal Society of London, Series B (1237 ed., Vol. 224, pp. 421-448)

A stochastic theory of community food webs. I. Models and aggregated data. / Cohen, J. E.; Newman, Charles.

Proceedings - Royal Society of London, Series B. Vol. 224 1237. ed. 1985. p. 421-448.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Cohen, JE & Newman, C 1985, A stochastic theory of community food webs. I. Models and aggregated data. in Proceedings - Royal Society of London, Series B. 1237 edn, vol. 224, pp. 421-448.
Cohen JE, Newman C. A stochastic theory of community food webs. I. Models and aggregated data. In Proceedings - Royal Society of London, Series B. 1237 ed. Vol. 224. 1985. p. 421-448
Cohen, J. E. ; Newman, Charles. / A stochastic theory of community food webs. I. Models and aggregated data. Proceedings - Royal Society of London, Series B. Vol. 224 1237. ed. 1985. pp. 421-448
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