A smoking cessation intervention for the methadone-maintained

Michael D. Stein, Marjorie C. Weinstock, Debra S. Herman, Bradley J. Anderson, Jennifer L. Anthony, Raymond Niaura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: To test, in combination with the nicotine patch, the incremental efficacy of a maximal, tailored behavioral treatment over a minimal treatment for smoking cessation. Design: Randomized clinical trial with 6-month follow-up. Setting: Five methadone maintenance treatment centers in Rhode Island. Participants: Three hundred and eighty-three methadone-maintained smokers. Intervention: Participants were assigned randomly to nicotine patch (8-12 weeks) plus either (1) a baseline tailored brief motivational intervention, a quit date behavioral skills counseling session and a relapse prevention follow-up session (Max) or (2) brief advice using the National Cancer Institute's 4 As model (Min). An intent-to-treat analysis with those lost to follow-up assumed to smoke was used. Measurements: Carbon monoxide (CO)-confirmed 7-day point smoking cessation prevalence at 3 and 6 months, and self-reported numbers of cigarettes smoked per day. Findings: Participants had a mean age of 40 years, were 53% male, 78% Caucasian, smoked 26.7 (± 12.2) cigarettes/day and had a mean methadone dose of 95.5 mg. At 3 months, 317 (83%) were reinterviewed; at 6 months, 312 (82%) were reinterviewed. The intent-to-treat, 7-day point prevalence estimate of cessation was 5.2% in the Max group and 4.7% in the Min group (P = 0.81) at 6 months. In logistic models with treatment condition, age, gender, race, Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence and cigarettes per day as covariates, males were more likely to be abstinent at 3 months (OR 4.67; P = 0.003) and 6 months (OR 4.01; P = 0.015). Conclusion: A tailored behavioral intervention did not increase quit rates over patch and minimal treatment. Smoking cessation rates in methadone-maintained smokers are low, with men having greater success.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)599-607
Number of pages9
JournalAddiction
Volume101
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

Fingerprint

Methadone
Smoking Cessation
Tobacco Products
Tobacco Use Cessation Products
Therapeutics
Tobacco Use Disorder
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Lost to Follow-Up
Carbon Monoxide
Secondary Prevention
Smoke
Counseling
Randomized Controlled Trials
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Methadone maintenance
  • Motivational intervention
  • Smoking cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Stein, M. D., Weinstock, M. C., Herman, D. S., Anderson, B. J., Anthony, J. L., & Niaura, R. (2006). A smoking cessation intervention for the methadone-maintained. Addiction, 101(4), 599-607. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2006.01406.x

A smoking cessation intervention for the methadone-maintained. / Stein, Michael D.; Weinstock, Marjorie C.; Herman, Debra S.; Anderson, Bradley J.; Anthony, Jennifer L.; Niaura, Raymond.

In: Addiction, Vol. 101, No. 4, 04.2006, p. 599-607.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stein, MD, Weinstock, MC, Herman, DS, Anderson, BJ, Anthony, JL & Niaura, R 2006, 'A smoking cessation intervention for the methadone-maintained', Addiction, vol. 101, no. 4, pp. 599-607. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2006.01406.x
Stein MD, Weinstock MC, Herman DS, Anderson BJ, Anthony JL, Niaura R. A smoking cessation intervention for the methadone-maintained. Addiction. 2006 Apr;101(4):599-607. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2006.01406.x
Stein, Michael D. ; Weinstock, Marjorie C. ; Herman, Debra S. ; Anderson, Bradley J. ; Anthony, Jennifer L. ; Niaura, Raymond. / A smoking cessation intervention for the methadone-maintained. In: Addiction. 2006 ; Vol. 101, No. 4. pp. 599-607.
@article{823039ca031b4033a95a80a5b3f3319f,
title = "A smoking cessation intervention for the methadone-maintained",
abstract = "Aim: To test, in combination with the nicotine patch, the incremental efficacy of a maximal, tailored behavioral treatment over a minimal treatment for smoking cessation. Design: Randomized clinical trial with 6-month follow-up. Setting: Five methadone maintenance treatment centers in Rhode Island. Participants: Three hundred and eighty-three methadone-maintained smokers. Intervention: Participants were assigned randomly to nicotine patch (8-12 weeks) plus either (1) a baseline tailored brief motivational intervention, a quit date behavioral skills counseling session and a relapse prevention follow-up session (Max) or (2) brief advice using the National Cancer Institute's 4 As model (Min). An intent-to-treat analysis with those lost to follow-up assumed to smoke was used. Measurements: Carbon monoxide (CO)-confirmed 7-day point smoking cessation prevalence at 3 and 6 months, and self-reported numbers of cigarettes smoked per day. Findings: Participants had a mean age of 40 years, were 53{\%} male, 78{\%} Caucasian, smoked 26.7 (± 12.2) cigarettes/day and had a mean methadone dose of 95.5 mg. At 3 months, 317 (83{\%}) were reinterviewed; at 6 months, 312 (82{\%}) were reinterviewed. The intent-to-treat, 7-day point prevalence estimate of cessation was 5.2{\%} in the Max group and 4.7{\%} in the Min group (P = 0.81) at 6 months. In logistic models with treatment condition, age, gender, race, Fagerstr{\"o}m Test for Nicotine Dependence and cigarettes per day as covariates, males were more likely to be abstinent at 3 months (OR 4.67; P = 0.003) and 6 months (OR 4.01; P = 0.015). Conclusion: A tailored behavioral intervention did not increase quit rates over patch and minimal treatment. Smoking cessation rates in methadone-maintained smokers are low, with men having greater success.",
keywords = "Methadone maintenance, Motivational intervention, Smoking cessation",
author = "Stein, {Michael D.} and Weinstock, {Marjorie C.} and Herman, {Debra S.} and Anderson, {Bradley J.} and Anthony, {Jennifer L.} and Raymond Niaura",
year = "2006",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1111/j.1360-0443.2006.01406.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "101",
pages = "599--607",
journal = "Addiction",
issn = "0965-2140",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A smoking cessation intervention for the methadone-maintained

AU - Stein, Michael D.

AU - Weinstock, Marjorie C.

AU - Herman, Debra S.

AU - Anderson, Bradley J.

AU - Anthony, Jennifer L.

AU - Niaura, Raymond

PY - 2006/4

Y1 - 2006/4

N2 - Aim: To test, in combination with the nicotine patch, the incremental efficacy of a maximal, tailored behavioral treatment over a minimal treatment for smoking cessation. Design: Randomized clinical trial with 6-month follow-up. Setting: Five methadone maintenance treatment centers in Rhode Island. Participants: Three hundred and eighty-three methadone-maintained smokers. Intervention: Participants were assigned randomly to nicotine patch (8-12 weeks) plus either (1) a baseline tailored brief motivational intervention, a quit date behavioral skills counseling session and a relapse prevention follow-up session (Max) or (2) brief advice using the National Cancer Institute's 4 As model (Min). An intent-to-treat analysis with those lost to follow-up assumed to smoke was used. Measurements: Carbon monoxide (CO)-confirmed 7-day point smoking cessation prevalence at 3 and 6 months, and self-reported numbers of cigarettes smoked per day. Findings: Participants had a mean age of 40 years, were 53% male, 78% Caucasian, smoked 26.7 (± 12.2) cigarettes/day and had a mean methadone dose of 95.5 mg. At 3 months, 317 (83%) were reinterviewed; at 6 months, 312 (82%) were reinterviewed. The intent-to-treat, 7-day point prevalence estimate of cessation was 5.2% in the Max group and 4.7% in the Min group (P = 0.81) at 6 months. In logistic models with treatment condition, age, gender, race, Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence and cigarettes per day as covariates, males were more likely to be abstinent at 3 months (OR 4.67; P = 0.003) and 6 months (OR 4.01; P = 0.015). Conclusion: A tailored behavioral intervention did not increase quit rates over patch and minimal treatment. Smoking cessation rates in methadone-maintained smokers are low, with men having greater success.

AB - Aim: To test, in combination with the nicotine patch, the incremental efficacy of a maximal, tailored behavioral treatment over a minimal treatment for smoking cessation. Design: Randomized clinical trial with 6-month follow-up. Setting: Five methadone maintenance treatment centers in Rhode Island. Participants: Three hundred and eighty-three methadone-maintained smokers. Intervention: Participants were assigned randomly to nicotine patch (8-12 weeks) plus either (1) a baseline tailored brief motivational intervention, a quit date behavioral skills counseling session and a relapse prevention follow-up session (Max) or (2) brief advice using the National Cancer Institute's 4 As model (Min). An intent-to-treat analysis with those lost to follow-up assumed to smoke was used. Measurements: Carbon monoxide (CO)-confirmed 7-day point smoking cessation prevalence at 3 and 6 months, and self-reported numbers of cigarettes smoked per day. Findings: Participants had a mean age of 40 years, were 53% male, 78% Caucasian, smoked 26.7 (± 12.2) cigarettes/day and had a mean methadone dose of 95.5 mg. At 3 months, 317 (83%) were reinterviewed; at 6 months, 312 (82%) were reinterviewed. The intent-to-treat, 7-day point prevalence estimate of cessation was 5.2% in the Max group and 4.7% in the Min group (P = 0.81) at 6 months. In logistic models with treatment condition, age, gender, race, Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence and cigarettes per day as covariates, males were more likely to be abstinent at 3 months (OR 4.67; P = 0.003) and 6 months (OR 4.01; P = 0.015). Conclusion: A tailored behavioral intervention did not increase quit rates over patch and minimal treatment. Smoking cessation rates in methadone-maintained smokers are low, with men having greater success.

KW - Methadone maintenance

KW - Motivational intervention

KW - Smoking cessation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33644849310&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33644849310&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2006.01406.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2006.01406.x

M3 - Article

VL - 101

SP - 599

EP - 607

JO - Addiction

JF - Addiction

SN - 0965-2140

IS - 4

ER -