A rebrightening of the radio nebula associated with the 2004 December 27 giant flare from SGR 1806-20

Joseph (Yosi) Gelfand, Y. E. Lyubarsky, D. Eichler, B. M. Gaensler, G. B. Taylor, J. Granot, K. J. Newton-Mcgee, E. Ramirez-Ruiz, C. Kouveliotou, R. A.M.J. Wijers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The 2004 December 27 giant γ-ray flare detected from the magnetar SGR 1806-20 created an expanding radio nebula that we have monitored with the Australia Telescope Compact Array and the Very Large Array. These data indicate that there was an increase in the observed flux ∼25 days after the initial flare that lasted for ∼8 days, which we believe is the result of ambient material swept up and shocked by this radio nebula. For a distance to SGR 1806-20 of 15 kpc, using the properties of this rebrightening, we infer that the initial blast wave was dominated by baryonic material of mass M ≳ 10 24.5 g. For an initial expansion velocity v ∼ 0.7c (as derived in an accompanying paper), we infer that this material had an initial kinetic energy E ≳ 1044.5 ergs. If this material originated from the magnetar itself, it may have emitted a burst of ultra-high-energy (E > 1 TeV) neutrinos far brighter than that expected from other astrophysical sources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAstrophysical Journal
Volume634
Issue number1 II
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 20 2005

Fingerprint

magnetars
nebulae
flares
radio
Very Large Array (VLA)
blasts
bursts
rays
astrophysics
neutrinos
kinetic energy
telescopes
expansion
erg
material
energy

Keywords

  • Neutrinos
  • Pulsars: individual (SGR 1806-20)
  • Radio continuum: stars
  • Shock waves
  • Stars: magnetic fields
  • Stars: neutron

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Gelfand, J. Y., Lyubarsky, Y. E., Eichler, D., Gaensler, B. M., Taylor, G. B., Granot, J., ... Wijers, R. A. M. J. (2005). A rebrightening of the radio nebula associated with the 2004 December 27 giant flare from SGR 1806-20. Astrophysical Journal, 634(1 II). https://doi.org/10.1086/498643

A rebrightening of the radio nebula associated with the 2004 December 27 giant flare from SGR 1806-20. / Gelfand, Joseph (Yosi); Lyubarsky, Y. E.; Eichler, D.; Gaensler, B. M.; Taylor, G. B.; Granot, J.; Newton-Mcgee, K. J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wijers, R. A.M.J.

In: Astrophysical Journal, Vol. 634, No. 1 II, 20.11.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gelfand, JY, Lyubarsky, YE, Eichler, D, Gaensler, BM, Taylor, GB, Granot, J, Newton-Mcgee, KJ, Ramirez-Ruiz, E, Kouveliotou, C & Wijers, RAMJ 2005, 'A rebrightening of the radio nebula associated with the 2004 December 27 giant flare from SGR 1806-20', Astrophysical Journal, vol. 634, no. 1 II. https://doi.org/10.1086/498643
Gelfand, Joseph (Yosi) ; Lyubarsky, Y. E. ; Eichler, D. ; Gaensler, B. M. ; Taylor, G. B. ; Granot, J. ; Newton-Mcgee, K. J. ; Ramirez-Ruiz, E. ; Kouveliotou, C. ; Wijers, R. A.M.J. / A rebrightening of the radio nebula associated with the 2004 December 27 giant flare from SGR 1806-20. In: Astrophysical Journal. 2005 ; Vol. 634, No. 1 II.
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