A re-examination of the validity and reliability of the School-Age Temperament Inventory.

Sandra Graham McClowry, Charles F. Halverson, Ann Sanson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: As a construct, temperament provides a framework for understanding differences among individuals in reaction to their life experiences. The measurement of the construct concerns both researchers and clinicians. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine whether the School-Age Temperament Inventory continued to demonstrate reliability and validity when retested with three existent samples of parent respondents. METHOD: Sample 1 was a sociodemographically and racially heterogeneous group of 200 children from New England in the United States. Data for Sample 2 was provided by 589 mothers and fathers from the state of Georgia in the United States. In Sample 3, data was provided by parents (principally, mothers) of 1,391 adolescents from Australia. Orthogonal Procrustes rotations were conducted to examine the underlying structure of the inventory when it was contrasted with the results obtained in the original standardization of the tool. RESULTS: The total coefficients of congruence for the samples were .88 to .97, while those of the four factors ranged from .84 to .98. Across the samples, Cronbach alphas for the dimensions ranged from .80 to .92. Independent t-tests identified that boys were significantly more active and less task persistent than girls. However, regression analyses revealed that sex accounted for only 5% of the variance in task persistence and activity. DISCUSSION: The results provide substantial additional support for the reliability and validity of the School-Age Temperament Inventory. Recommendations for future research are offered which include exploring the role of temperament in contributing to developmental outcomes in children and examining cross-cultural samples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-182
Number of pages7
JournalNursing Research
Volume52
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 2003

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Temperament
Reproducibility of Results
Equipment and Supplies
Mothers
New England
Life Change Events
Individuality
Fathers
Parents
Regression Analysis
Research Personnel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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A re-examination of the validity and reliability of the School-Age Temperament Inventory. / McClowry, Sandra Graham; Halverson, Charles F.; Sanson, Ann.

In: Nursing Research, Vol. 52, No. 3, 05.2003, p. 176-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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