A qualitative meta-analysis of heart failure self-care practices among individuals with multiple comorbid conditions

Victoria Vaughan Dickson, Harleah Buck, Barbara Riegel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Most heart failure (HF) patients have other comorbid conditions. HF self-care requires medication and diet adherence, daily weight monitoring, and a thoughtful response to symptoms when they occur. Self-care is complicated when other chronic conditions have additional self-care requirements. The purpose of this study is to explore how comorbidity influences HF self-care. Methods: Using qualitative descriptive meta-analysis techniques, transcripts from 3 mixed methods studies (n = 99) were reexamined to yield themes about perceptions about HF and self-care and to explore the influence on HF self-care. The Charlson Comorbidity Index identified comorbid conditions. Results: The sample was 74% Caucasian, 66% male (mean age of 59.6 years ± 15 years). Fifty-three percent of the sample was New York Heart Association Class III. All had at least 1 other chronic condition. Narrative accounts revealed that adherence to diet, symptom monitoring, and differentiating symptoms from multiple conditions were the most challenging self-care skills. Emerging themes included 1) attitudes drive self-care prioritization and 2) fragmented self-care instruction leads to poor self-care integration and self-care skill deficits. Conclusions: Individuals with multiple chronic conditions are vulnerable to poor self-care. Research testing coaching interventions that integrate self-care requirements and focus on developing skill in self-care across multiple chronic conditions is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)413-419
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Cardiac Failure
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

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Self Care
Meta-Analysis
Heart Failure
Comorbidity
Diet
Medication Adherence

Keywords

  • comorbidity
  • heart failure
  • Self-care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

A qualitative meta-analysis of heart failure self-care practices among individuals with multiple comorbid conditions. / Vaughan Dickson, Victoria; Buck, Harleah; Riegel, Barbara.

In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, Vol. 17, No. 5, 05.2011, p. 413-419.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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