A prospective study of respiratory symptoms associated with chronic arsenic exposure in Bangladesh

Findings from the health effects of arsenic longitudinal study (HEALS)

Faruque Parvez, Yu Chen, Paul W. Brandt-Rauf, Vesna Slavkovich, Tariqul Islam, Alauddin Ahmed, Maria Argos, Rabiul Hassan, Mahbub Yunus, Syed E. Haque, Olgica Balac, Joseph H. Graziano, Habibul Ahsan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and aims: A prospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the effect of arsenic (As) exposure from drinking water on respiratory symptoms using data from the Health Effects of Arsenic Exposure Longitudinal Study (HEALS), a large prospective cohort study established in Ariahazar, Bangladesh in 2000-2002. A total of 7.31, 9.95 and 2.03% of the 11 746 participants completing 4 years of active follow-up reported having a chronic cough, breathing problem or blood in their sputum, respectively, as assessed by trained physicians. Methods: Cox regression models were used to estimate HRs for respiratory symptoms during the follow-up period in relation to levels of chronic As exposure assessed at baseline, adjusting for age, gender, smoking, body mass index, education and arsenic-related skin lesion status. Results: Significant positive associations were found between As exposure and respiratory symptoms. As compared with those with the lowest quintile of water As level (≤7 μg/l), the HRs for having respiratory symptoms were 1.27 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.48), 1.39 (95% CI 1.19 to 1.63), 1.43 (95% CI 1.23 to 1.68) and 1.43 (95% CI 1.22 to 1.68) for the second to fifth quintiles of baseline water As concentrations (7-40, 40-90, 90-178 and >178 μg/l), respectively. Similarly, the corresponding HRs in relation to the second to fifth quintiles of urinary arsenic were 1.10 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.27), 1.11 (95% CI 0.95 to 1.29), 1.29 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.49) and 1.35 (95% CI 1.16 to 1.56), respectively. These associations did not differ appreciably by cigarette smoking status. Conclusions: This prospective cohort study found a dose-response relationship between As exposure and clinical symptoms of respiratory diseases in Bangladesh. In particular, these adverse respiratory effects of As were clearly evident in the low to moderate dose range, suggesting that a large proportion of the country's population may be at risk of developing serious lung diseases in the future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)528-533
Number of pages6
JournalThorax
Volume65
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Bangladesh
Arsenic
Longitudinal Studies
Prospective Studies
Health
Cohort Studies
Smoking
Water
Sputum
Proportional Hazards Models
Cough
Drinking Water
Lung Diseases
Respiration
Body Mass Index
Physicians
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A prospective study of respiratory symptoms associated with chronic arsenic exposure in Bangladesh : Findings from the health effects of arsenic longitudinal study (HEALS). / Parvez, Faruque; Chen, Yu; Brandt-Rauf, Paul W.; Slavkovich, Vesna; Islam, Tariqul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Argos, Maria; Hassan, Rabiul; Yunus, Mahbub; Haque, Syed E.; Balac, Olgica; Graziano, Joseph H.; Ahsan, Habibul.

In: Thorax, Vol. 65, No. 6, 2010, p. 528-533.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Parvez, F, Chen, Y, Brandt-Rauf, PW, Slavkovich, V, Islam, T, Ahmed, A, Argos, M, Hassan, R, Yunus, M, Haque, SE, Balac, O, Graziano, JH & Ahsan, H 2010, 'A prospective study of respiratory symptoms associated with chronic arsenic exposure in Bangladesh: Findings from the health effects of arsenic longitudinal study (HEALS)', Thorax, vol. 65, no. 6, pp. 528-533. https://doi.org/10.1136/thx.2009.119347
Parvez, Faruque ; Chen, Yu ; Brandt-Rauf, Paul W. ; Slavkovich, Vesna ; Islam, Tariqul ; Ahmed, Alauddin ; Argos, Maria ; Hassan, Rabiul ; Yunus, Mahbub ; Haque, Syed E. ; Balac, Olgica ; Graziano, Joseph H. ; Ahsan, Habibul. / A prospective study of respiratory symptoms associated with chronic arsenic exposure in Bangladesh : Findings from the health effects of arsenic longitudinal study (HEALS). In: Thorax. 2010 ; Vol. 65, No. 6. pp. 528-533.
@article{1393088ce94a4fa59aaec62a1aaab982,
title = "A prospective study of respiratory symptoms associated with chronic arsenic exposure in Bangladesh: Findings from the health effects of arsenic longitudinal study (HEALS)",
abstract = "Background and aims: A prospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the effect of arsenic (As) exposure from drinking water on respiratory symptoms using data from the Health Effects of Arsenic Exposure Longitudinal Study (HEALS), a large prospective cohort study established in Ariahazar, Bangladesh in 2000-2002. A total of 7.31, 9.95 and 2.03{\%} of the 11 746 participants completing 4 years of active follow-up reported having a chronic cough, breathing problem or blood in their sputum, respectively, as assessed by trained physicians. Methods: Cox regression models were used to estimate HRs for respiratory symptoms during the follow-up period in relation to levels of chronic As exposure assessed at baseline, adjusting for age, gender, smoking, body mass index, education and arsenic-related skin lesion status. Results: Significant positive associations were found between As exposure and respiratory symptoms. As compared with those with the lowest quintile of water As level (≤7 μg/l), the HRs for having respiratory symptoms were 1.27 (95{\%} CI 1.09 to 1.48), 1.39 (95{\%} CI 1.19 to 1.63), 1.43 (95{\%} CI 1.23 to 1.68) and 1.43 (95{\%} CI 1.22 to 1.68) for the second to fifth quintiles of baseline water As concentrations (7-40, 40-90, 90-178 and >178 μg/l), respectively. Similarly, the corresponding HRs in relation to the second to fifth quintiles of urinary arsenic were 1.10 (95{\%} CI 0.94 to 1.27), 1.11 (95{\%} CI 0.95 to 1.29), 1.29 (95{\%} CI 1.11 to 1.49) and 1.35 (95{\%} CI 1.16 to 1.56), respectively. These associations did not differ appreciably by cigarette smoking status. Conclusions: This prospective cohort study found a dose-response relationship between As exposure and clinical symptoms of respiratory diseases in Bangladesh. In particular, these adverse respiratory effects of As were clearly evident in the low to moderate dose range, suggesting that a large proportion of the country's population may be at risk of developing serious lung diseases in the future.",
author = "Faruque Parvez and Yu Chen and Brandt-Rauf, {Paul W.} and Vesna Slavkovich and Tariqul Islam and Alauddin Ahmed and Maria Argos and Rabiul Hassan and Mahbub Yunus and Haque, {Syed E.} and Olgica Balac and Graziano, {Joseph H.} and Habibul Ahsan",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1136/thx.2009.119347",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "65",
pages = "528--533",
journal = "Thorax",
issn = "0040-6376",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A prospective study of respiratory symptoms associated with chronic arsenic exposure in Bangladesh

T2 - Findings from the health effects of arsenic longitudinal study (HEALS)

AU - Parvez, Faruque

AU - Chen, Yu

AU - Brandt-Rauf, Paul W.

AU - Slavkovich, Vesna

AU - Islam, Tariqul

AU - Ahmed, Alauddin

AU - Argos, Maria

AU - Hassan, Rabiul

AU - Yunus, Mahbub

AU - Haque, Syed E.

AU - Balac, Olgica

AU - Graziano, Joseph H.

AU - Ahsan, Habibul

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Background and aims: A prospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the effect of arsenic (As) exposure from drinking water on respiratory symptoms using data from the Health Effects of Arsenic Exposure Longitudinal Study (HEALS), a large prospective cohort study established in Ariahazar, Bangladesh in 2000-2002. A total of 7.31, 9.95 and 2.03% of the 11 746 participants completing 4 years of active follow-up reported having a chronic cough, breathing problem or blood in their sputum, respectively, as assessed by trained physicians. Methods: Cox regression models were used to estimate HRs for respiratory symptoms during the follow-up period in relation to levels of chronic As exposure assessed at baseline, adjusting for age, gender, smoking, body mass index, education and arsenic-related skin lesion status. Results: Significant positive associations were found between As exposure and respiratory symptoms. As compared with those with the lowest quintile of water As level (≤7 μg/l), the HRs for having respiratory symptoms were 1.27 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.48), 1.39 (95% CI 1.19 to 1.63), 1.43 (95% CI 1.23 to 1.68) and 1.43 (95% CI 1.22 to 1.68) for the second to fifth quintiles of baseline water As concentrations (7-40, 40-90, 90-178 and >178 μg/l), respectively. Similarly, the corresponding HRs in relation to the second to fifth quintiles of urinary arsenic were 1.10 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.27), 1.11 (95% CI 0.95 to 1.29), 1.29 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.49) and 1.35 (95% CI 1.16 to 1.56), respectively. These associations did not differ appreciably by cigarette smoking status. Conclusions: This prospective cohort study found a dose-response relationship between As exposure and clinical symptoms of respiratory diseases in Bangladesh. In particular, these adverse respiratory effects of As were clearly evident in the low to moderate dose range, suggesting that a large proportion of the country's population may be at risk of developing serious lung diseases in the future.

AB - Background and aims: A prospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the effect of arsenic (As) exposure from drinking water on respiratory symptoms using data from the Health Effects of Arsenic Exposure Longitudinal Study (HEALS), a large prospective cohort study established in Ariahazar, Bangladesh in 2000-2002. A total of 7.31, 9.95 and 2.03% of the 11 746 participants completing 4 years of active follow-up reported having a chronic cough, breathing problem or blood in their sputum, respectively, as assessed by trained physicians. Methods: Cox regression models were used to estimate HRs for respiratory symptoms during the follow-up period in relation to levels of chronic As exposure assessed at baseline, adjusting for age, gender, smoking, body mass index, education and arsenic-related skin lesion status. Results: Significant positive associations were found between As exposure and respiratory symptoms. As compared with those with the lowest quintile of water As level (≤7 μg/l), the HRs for having respiratory symptoms were 1.27 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.48), 1.39 (95% CI 1.19 to 1.63), 1.43 (95% CI 1.23 to 1.68) and 1.43 (95% CI 1.22 to 1.68) for the second to fifth quintiles of baseline water As concentrations (7-40, 40-90, 90-178 and >178 μg/l), respectively. Similarly, the corresponding HRs in relation to the second to fifth quintiles of urinary arsenic were 1.10 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.27), 1.11 (95% CI 0.95 to 1.29), 1.29 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.49) and 1.35 (95% CI 1.16 to 1.56), respectively. These associations did not differ appreciably by cigarette smoking status. Conclusions: This prospective cohort study found a dose-response relationship between As exposure and clinical symptoms of respiratory diseases in Bangladesh. In particular, these adverse respiratory effects of As were clearly evident in the low to moderate dose range, suggesting that a large proportion of the country's population may be at risk of developing serious lung diseases in the future.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77953699322&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77953699322&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/thx.2009.119347

DO - 10.1136/thx.2009.119347

M3 - Article

VL - 65

SP - 528

EP - 533

JO - Thorax

JF - Thorax

SN - 0040-6376

IS - 6

ER -