A procedural critique of deontological reasoning

Julian Togelius

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    This paper describes a prototype game that learns its rules from the actions and commands of the player. This game can be seen as an implementation and procedural critique of Kant's categorical imperative, suggesting to the player that (1) the maxim of an action is in general underdetermined by the action and its context, so that an external observer will more often than not get the underlying maxim wrong, and that (2) most ingame actions are morally "wrong" in the sense that they do not contribute to wellbalanced game design. But it can also be seen as an embryo for an authoring tool for game designers, where they can easily and fluidly prototype new game mechanics.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationProceedings of DiGRA 2011 Conference: Think Design Play
    StatePublished - 2011
    Event5th International Conference on Digital Research Association: Think Design Play, DiGRA 2011 - Utrecht, Netherlands
    Duration: Sep 14 2011Sep 17 2011

    Other

    Other5th International Conference on Digital Research Association: Think Design Play, DiGRA 2011
    CountryNetherlands
    CityUtrecht
    Period9/14/119/17/11

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    Mechanics

    Keywords

    • Artificial intelligence
    • Ethics
    • Kant
    • Mechanics
    • Procedural content generation
    • Procedural rhetoric
    • Rules

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
    • Human-Computer Interaction
    • Software

    Cite this

    Togelius, J. (2011). A procedural critique of deontological reasoning. In Proceedings of DiGRA 2011 Conference: Think Design Play

    A procedural critique of deontological reasoning. / Togelius, Julian.

    Proceedings of DiGRA 2011 Conference: Think Design Play. 2011.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Togelius, J 2011, A procedural critique of deontological reasoning. in Proceedings of DiGRA 2011 Conference: Think Design Play. 5th International Conference on Digital Research Association: Think Design Play, DiGRA 2011, Utrecht, Netherlands, 9/14/11.
    Togelius J. A procedural critique of deontological reasoning. In Proceedings of DiGRA 2011 Conference: Think Design Play. 2011
    Togelius, Julian. / A procedural critique of deontological reasoning. Proceedings of DiGRA 2011 Conference: Think Design Play. 2011.
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