A Preliminary Examination of Child Well-Being of Physically Abused and Neglected Children Compared to a Normative Pediatric Population

Paul Lanier, Patricia L. Kohl, Ramesh Raghavan, Wendy Auslander

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Federal mandates require state child welfare systems to monitor and improve outcomes for children in three areas: safety, permanency, and well-being. Research across separate domains of child well-being indicates maltreated children may experience lower pediatric health–related quality of life (HRQL). This study assessed well-being in maltreated children using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL 4.0), a widely used measure of pediatric HRQL. The PedsQL 4.0 was used to assess well-being in a sample of children (N = 129) receiving child welfare services following reports of alleged physical abuse or neglect. We compared total scores and domain scores for this maltreated sample to those of a published normative sample. Within the maltreated sample, we also compared well-being by child and family demographic characteristics. As compared with a normative pediatric population, maltreated children reported significantly lower total, physical, and psychosocial health. We found no significant differences in total and domain scores based on child and parent demographics within the maltreated sample. This preliminary exploration indicates children receiving child welfare services have significantly lower well-being status than the general child population and have considerable deficits in social and emotional functioning. These findings support continued investment in maltreatment prevention and services to improve the well-being of victims of maltreatment.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)72-79
    Number of pages8
    JournalChild Maltreatment
    Volume20
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Feb 6 2015

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    Child Welfare
    Pediatrics
    Population
    Quality of Life
    Demography
    Safety
    Equipment and Supplies
    Health
    Research

    Keywords

    • child maltreatment
    • children in child welfare
    • physical health

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
    • Developmental and Educational Psychology

    Cite this

    A Preliminary Examination of Child Well-Being of Physically Abused and Neglected Children Compared to a Normative Pediatric Population. / Lanier, Paul; Kohl, Patricia L.; Raghavan, Ramesh; Auslander, Wendy.

    In: Child Maltreatment, Vol. 20, No. 1, 06.02.2015, p. 72-79.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Lanier, Paul ; Kohl, Patricia L. ; Raghavan, Ramesh ; Auslander, Wendy. / A Preliminary Examination of Child Well-Being of Physically Abused and Neglected Children Compared to a Normative Pediatric Population. In: Child Maltreatment. 2015 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 72-79.
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