A PII-like protein in Arabidopsis: Putative role in nitrogen sensing

Ming Hsiun Hsieh, Hon Ming Lam, Frank J. Van De Loo, Gloria Coruzzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PII is a protein allosteric effector in Escherichia coli and other bacteria that indirectly regulates glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional and post-translational levels in response to nitrogen availability. Data supporting the notion that plants have a nitrogen regulatory system(s) includes previous studies showing that the levels of mRNA for plant nitrogen assimilatory genes such as glutamine synthetase (GLN) and asparagine synthetase (ASN) are modulated by carbon and organic nitrogen metabolites. Here, we have characterized a PII homolog (GLB1) in two higher plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Ricinus communis (Castor bean). Each plant PII-like protein has high overall identity to E. coli PII (50%). Western blot analyses reveal that the plant PII-like protein is a nuclear-encoded chloroplast protein. The PII-like protein of plants appears to be regulated at the transcriptional level in that levels of GLB1 mRNA are affected by light and metabolites. To initiate studies of the in vivo function of the Arabidopsis PII-like protein, we have constructed transgenic lines in which PII expression is uncoupled from its native regulation. Analyses of these transgenic plants support the notion that the plant PII-like protein may serve as part of a complex signal transduction network involved in perceiving the status of carbon and organic nitrogen. Thus, the PII protein found in archaea, bacteria, and now in higher eukaryotes (plants) is one of the most widespread regulatory proteins known, providing evidence for an ancestral metabolic regulatory mechanism that may have existed before the divergence of these three domains of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13965-13970
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume95
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 10 1998

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Arabidopsis Proteins
Nitrogen
Glutamate-Ammonia Ligase
Proteins
Aspartate-Ammonia Ligase
Carbon
Castor Bean
Chloroplast Proteins
Escherichia coli
Ricinus
Bacteria
Plant Proteins
Messenger RNA
Genetically Modified Plants
Archaea
Eukaryota
Arabidopsis
Signal Transduction
Western Blotting
Light

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

A PII-like protein in Arabidopsis : Putative role in nitrogen sensing. / Hsieh, Ming Hsiun; Lam, Hon Ming; Van De Loo, Frank J.; Coruzzi, Gloria.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 95, No. 23, 10.11.1998, p. 13965-13970.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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