A parent-based intervention to reduce sexual risk behavior in early adolescence: Building alliances between physicians, social workers, and parents

Vincent Guilamo-Ramos, Alida Bouris, James Jaccard, Bernardo Gonzalez, Wanda McCoy, Diane Aranda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of a parent-based intervention to prevent sexual risk behavior among Latino and African American young adults. This was delivered to mothers while waiting for their adolescent child to complete an annual physical examination. Methods: A randomized clinical trial was conducted with 264 motheradolescent dyads in New York City. Adolescents were eligible for the study only if they were African American or Latino and aged 1114 years, inclusive. Dyads completed a brief baseline survey and were then randomly assigned to one of the following two conditions: (1) a parent-based intervention (n = 133), or (2) a "standard care" control condition (n = 131). Parents and adolescents completed a follow-up survey nine months later. The primary outcomes included whether the adolescent had ever engaged in vaginal sexual intercourse, the frequency of sexual intercourse, and the frequency of oral sex. Results: Relative to the control group, statistically significant reduced rates of transitioning to sexual activity and frequency of sexual intercourse were observed, with oral sex reductions nearly reaching statistical significance (p < .054). Specifically, sexual activity increased from 6% to 22% for young adults in the "standard of care" control condition, although it remained at 6% among young adults in the intervention condition at the 9-month follow-up. Conclusions: A parent-based intervention delivered to mothers in a pediatric clinic as they waited for their child to complete a physical examination may be an effective way to reduce sexual risk behaviors among Latino and African American middle-school young adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-163
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011

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Risk-Taking
Sexual Behavior
Parents
Physicians
Young Adult
Coitus
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Physical Examination
Mothers
Standard of Care
Social Workers
Randomized Controlled Trials
Pediatrics
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Adolescent sexuality
  • Clinic-based intervention
  • Parent-based intervention
  • Pediatricians
  • Sexual risk behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

A parent-based intervention to reduce sexual risk behavior in early adolescence : Building alliances between physicians, social workers, and parents. / Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Bouris, Alida; Jaccard, James; Gonzalez, Bernardo; McCoy, Wanda; Aranda, Diane.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 48, No. 2, 02.2011, p. 159-163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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