A nurse-coaching intervention for women with type 2 diabetes

Robin Whittemore, Gail D'Eramo Melkus, Amy Sullivan, Margaret Grey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: the purpose of this pilot study was to determine the efficacy of a 6-month nurse-coaching intervention that was provided after diabetes education for women with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: In this pilot study, 53 women were randomized to the nurse-coaching intervention or a standard care control condition. The nurse-coaching intervention consisted of 5 individualized sessions and 2 follow-up phone calls over 6 months. The nurse-coaching sessions included educational, behavioral, and affective strategies. Data were collected on physiologic adaptation (hemoglobin A1c [A1C] and body mass index [BMI]), self-management (dietary and exercise), psychosocial adaptation (diabetes-related distress and integration), and treatment satisfaction at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. RESULTS: Women in the treatment group demonstrated better diet self-management, less diabetes-related distress, better integration, and more satisfaction with care, and had trends of better exercise self-management and BMI. The A1C levels improved in both groups at 3 months, yet the difference between the groups was not significant. Attendance at nurse-coaching sessions was 96%. CONCLUSIONS: This nurse-coaching intervention demonstrates promise as a means of improving self-management and psychosocial outcomes in women with type 2 diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)795-804
Number of pages10
JournalDiabetes Educator
Volume30
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 2004

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Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Nurses
Self Care
Body Mass Index
Exercise
Physiological Adaptation
Mentoring
Hemoglobins
Diet
Education
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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Whittemore, R., D'Eramo Melkus, G., Sullivan, A., & Grey, M. (2004). A nurse-coaching intervention for women with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Educator, 30(5), 795-804.

A nurse-coaching intervention for women with type 2 diabetes. / Whittemore, Robin; D'Eramo Melkus, Gail; Sullivan, Amy; Grey, Margaret.

In: Diabetes Educator, Vol. 30, No. 5, 09.2004, p. 795-804.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Whittemore, R, D'Eramo Melkus, G, Sullivan, A & Grey, M 2004, 'A nurse-coaching intervention for women with type 2 diabetes', Diabetes Educator, vol. 30, no. 5, pp. 795-804.
Whittemore, Robin ; D'Eramo Melkus, Gail ; Sullivan, Amy ; Grey, Margaret. / A nurse-coaching intervention for women with type 2 diabetes. In: Diabetes Educator. 2004 ; Vol. 30, No. 5. pp. 795-804.
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