A new methodology for assessing social work practice: The adaptation of the objective structured clinical evaluation (SW-OSCE)

Yuhwa Eva Lu, Eileen Ain, Charissa Chamorro, Chiung Yun Chang, Joyce Yen Feng, Rowena Fong, Betty Garcia, Robert Leibson Hawkins, Muriel Yu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Objective Structured Clinical Evaluation (OSCE) methodology was originally developed to assess medical students. OSCE is a carefully scripted, standardized, simulated interview, in which students' interactional skills are observed and assessed. Here it is examined for its potential use in assessing social work practice skills. The development of the Social Work OSCE (SW-OSCE) and the Clinical Competence-based Behavioural Checklist (CCBC) are described. Findings from a pilot study assessing MSW students' clinical skills with explicit observable criteria of the CCBC are presented. A quantitative and qualitative mixed-methods data analysis was applied. The CCBC had high internal reliability, for both the overall sample and for the different case scenarios, with Cronbach's alpha values ranging from 0.888 to 0.965. The validity of the instrument was also examined: qualitative content analysis of the taped interviews indicated that clinical skills and cultural empathy are not synonymous. The racial/ethnic match between the student and the 'client' did not predict better rapport or more cultural empathy. Examination grades are not necessarily consistent with actual performance in either clinical competence or cultural empathy or vice versa. Nevertheless, the results provide some support for the use of the SW-OSCE as a tool for assessing performance in social work practice. They also indicate its potential for evaluating the outcomes of educational programmes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)170-185
Number of pages16
JournalSocial Work Education
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

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social work
empathy
methodology
evaluation
student
interview
educational program
performance
medical student
content analysis
data analysis
scenario
examination
Values

Keywords

  • Assessment of social work students
  • Cultural empathy
  • Objective structured clinical evaluation
  • Outcomes of social work education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

A new methodology for assessing social work practice : The adaptation of the objective structured clinical evaluation (SW-OSCE). / Lu, Yuhwa Eva; Ain, Eileen; Chamorro, Charissa; Chang, Chiung Yun; Feng, Joyce Yen; Fong, Rowena; Garcia, Betty; Hawkins, Robert Leibson; Yu, Muriel.

In: Social Work Education, Vol. 30, No. 2, 03.2011, p. 170-185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lu, Yuhwa Eva ; Ain, Eileen ; Chamorro, Charissa ; Chang, Chiung Yun ; Feng, Joyce Yen ; Fong, Rowena ; Garcia, Betty ; Hawkins, Robert Leibson ; Yu, Muriel. / A new methodology for assessing social work practice : The adaptation of the objective structured clinical evaluation (SW-OSCE). In: Social Work Education. 2011 ; Vol. 30, No. 2. pp. 170-185.
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