A new measure of contemporary life stress: Development, validation, and reliability of the CRISYS

Madeleine U. Shalowitz, Carolyn Berry, Kenneth A. Rasinski, Christine A. Dannhausen-Brun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. To develop and validate a measure of contemporary life stressors. Study Setting: Three interview studies: Study 1 (pilot), 32 caregivers receiving case management services for a child with chronic illness; Study 2 (validation), 311 caregivers of children receiving general pediatric care at a university clinic; Study 3 (reliability), 17 caregivers of children with a complex medical diagnosis. Study Design: Study 1: item development via discussions with case managers; piloted with caregivers. Study 2 examined psychometric properties of the measure and correlated it with the CES-D, a measure of depressive symptomatology and the PRO5-Part 2, a measure of perceived social support, to established its convergent construct validity. Study 3 established the test-retest reliability of the measure over two weeks by correlating two administration of the index. Data Collection. Face-to-face interviews in homes (Study 1) or in clinic waiting rooms (Studies 2 and 3) and by telephone (Study 3 retest). Principal Findings. The CRISYS is a flexible, multidimensional tool that demonstrates strong face, content, and construct validity, and excellent test-retest reliability. The format is easy to use and well accepted by respondents and is suitable for low-income populations. Conclusions: Researchers will find the CRISYS useful when evaluating the success of clinical model or a healthcare system, and the effectiveness of an insurance plan or a government program. Clinicians may also find that the CRISYS is an effective screen for family needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1381-1402
Number of pages22
JournalHealth Services Research
Volume33
Issue number5 I
StatePublished - Dec 1998

Fingerprint

Psychological Stress
Caregivers
Reproducibility of Results
Government Programs
Interviews
Validation Studies
Case Management
Poverty
Insurance
Telephone
Psychometrics
Social Support
Chronic Disease
Research Personnel
Pediatrics
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Health outcomes
  • Instrument development
  • Life events
  • Stress
  • Test validation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Shalowitz, M. U., Berry, C., Rasinski, K. A., & Dannhausen-Brun, C. A. (1998). A new measure of contemporary life stress: Development, validation, and reliability of the CRISYS. Health Services Research, 33(5 I), 1381-1402.

A new measure of contemporary life stress : Development, validation, and reliability of the CRISYS. / Shalowitz, Madeleine U.; Berry, Carolyn; Rasinski, Kenneth A.; Dannhausen-Brun, Christine A.

In: Health Services Research, Vol. 33, No. 5 I, 12.1998, p. 1381-1402.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shalowitz, MU, Berry, C, Rasinski, KA & Dannhausen-Brun, CA 1998, 'A new measure of contemporary life stress: Development, validation, and reliability of the CRISYS', Health Services Research, vol. 33, no. 5 I, pp. 1381-1402.
Shalowitz, Madeleine U. ; Berry, Carolyn ; Rasinski, Kenneth A. ; Dannhausen-Brun, Christine A. / A new measure of contemporary life stress : Development, validation, and reliability of the CRISYS. In: Health Services Research. 1998 ; Vol. 33, No. 5 I. pp. 1381-1402.
@article{42653155833c4bf98a4ab61e8f498810,
title = "A new measure of contemporary life stress: Development, validation, and reliability of the CRISYS",
abstract = "Objective. To develop and validate a measure of contemporary life stressors. Study Setting: Three interview studies: Study 1 (pilot), 32 caregivers receiving case management services for a child with chronic illness; Study 2 (validation), 311 caregivers of children receiving general pediatric care at a university clinic; Study 3 (reliability), 17 caregivers of children with a complex medical diagnosis. Study Design: Study 1: item development via discussions with case managers; piloted with caregivers. Study 2 examined psychometric properties of the measure and correlated it with the CES-D, a measure of depressive symptomatology and the PRO5-Part 2, a measure of perceived social support, to established its convergent construct validity. Study 3 established the test-retest reliability of the measure over two weeks by correlating two administration of the index. Data Collection. Face-to-face interviews in homes (Study 1) or in clinic waiting rooms (Studies 2 and 3) and by telephone (Study 3 retest). Principal Findings. The CRISYS is a flexible, multidimensional tool that demonstrates strong face, content, and construct validity, and excellent test-retest reliability. The format is easy to use and well accepted by respondents and is suitable for low-income populations. Conclusions: Researchers will find the CRISYS useful when evaluating the success of clinical model or a healthcare system, and the effectiveness of an insurance plan or a government program. Clinicians may also find that the CRISYS is an effective screen for family needs.",
keywords = "Health outcomes, Instrument development, Life events, Stress, Test validation",
author = "Shalowitz, {Madeleine U.} and Carolyn Berry and Rasinski, {Kenneth A.} and Dannhausen-Brun, {Christine A.}",
year = "1998",
month = "12",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "1381--1402",
journal = "Health Services Research",
issn = "0017-9124",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "5 I",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A new measure of contemporary life stress

T2 - Development, validation, and reliability of the CRISYS

AU - Shalowitz, Madeleine U.

AU - Berry, Carolyn

AU - Rasinski, Kenneth A.

AU - Dannhausen-Brun, Christine A.

PY - 1998/12

Y1 - 1998/12

N2 - Objective. To develop and validate a measure of contemporary life stressors. Study Setting: Three interview studies: Study 1 (pilot), 32 caregivers receiving case management services for a child with chronic illness; Study 2 (validation), 311 caregivers of children receiving general pediatric care at a university clinic; Study 3 (reliability), 17 caregivers of children with a complex medical diagnosis. Study Design: Study 1: item development via discussions with case managers; piloted with caregivers. Study 2 examined psychometric properties of the measure and correlated it with the CES-D, a measure of depressive symptomatology and the PRO5-Part 2, a measure of perceived social support, to established its convergent construct validity. Study 3 established the test-retest reliability of the measure over two weeks by correlating two administration of the index. Data Collection. Face-to-face interviews in homes (Study 1) or in clinic waiting rooms (Studies 2 and 3) and by telephone (Study 3 retest). Principal Findings. The CRISYS is a flexible, multidimensional tool that demonstrates strong face, content, and construct validity, and excellent test-retest reliability. The format is easy to use and well accepted by respondents and is suitable for low-income populations. Conclusions: Researchers will find the CRISYS useful when evaluating the success of clinical model or a healthcare system, and the effectiveness of an insurance plan or a government program. Clinicians may also find that the CRISYS is an effective screen for family needs.

AB - Objective. To develop and validate a measure of contemporary life stressors. Study Setting: Three interview studies: Study 1 (pilot), 32 caregivers receiving case management services for a child with chronic illness; Study 2 (validation), 311 caregivers of children receiving general pediatric care at a university clinic; Study 3 (reliability), 17 caregivers of children with a complex medical diagnosis. Study Design: Study 1: item development via discussions with case managers; piloted with caregivers. Study 2 examined psychometric properties of the measure and correlated it with the CES-D, a measure of depressive symptomatology and the PRO5-Part 2, a measure of perceived social support, to established its convergent construct validity. Study 3 established the test-retest reliability of the measure over two weeks by correlating two administration of the index. Data Collection. Face-to-face interviews in homes (Study 1) or in clinic waiting rooms (Studies 2 and 3) and by telephone (Study 3 retest). Principal Findings. The CRISYS is a flexible, multidimensional tool that demonstrates strong face, content, and construct validity, and excellent test-retest reliability. The format is easy to use and well accepted by respondents and is suitable for low-income populations. Conclusions: Researchers will find the CRISYS useful when evaluating the success of clinical model or a healthcare system, and the effectiveness of an insurance plan or a government program. Clinicians may also find that the CRISYS is an effective screen for family needs.

KW - Health outcomes

KW - Instrument development

KW - Life events

KW - Stress

KW - Test validation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032414418&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032414418&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 9865225

AN - SCOPUS:0032414418

VL - 33

SP - 1381

EP - 1402

JO - Health Services Research

JF - Health Services Research

SN - 0017-9124

IS - 5 I

ER -