A national survey of clinic sexual histories for sexually transmitted infection and HIV screening

Ann E. Kurth, King K. Holmes, Renee Hawkins, Matthew R. Golden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Optimal elements of a sexual history for sexually transmitted infection (STI) and HIV risk assessment remain undefined. Goal: The goal of this study was to describe sexual histories in use at STI clinics across the United States. Study: This study consisted of a cross-sectional survey of facilities in cities with populations > 200,000 (n = 65). Within each city, a public health STI clinic (71% of the sample) or other STI care facility (29%) was randomly selected and sexual history forms were requested. Information was obtained from 48 clinics (74% response). Results: Most forms recorded information on symptoms and prior STI (96%), condom use (88%), other contraception (85%), and numbers and gender (83%) of sex partners. Common HIV risk questions were injecting drug use (IDU; 94%), sex for drugs or money (58%), and sex with an HIV-positive or IDU partner (52%). Ascertainment of time during which risks occurred (contact periods) varied from the past 14 days to the past 12 months, with only 38% of clinics using any 1 time period. Few histories (17%) incorporated questions for men who have sex with men (MSM). Only 2 (4%) had space to record Information about sexual behaviors by the HIV status of the sex partner. Condom use was infrequently assessed specifically for vaginal and anal sex (13%), and condom use problems were rarely explored (10%). Most forms documented STI/HIV counseling, although few (25%) included specific risk reduction plans. Conclusions: Sexual histories are highly variable. Although challenging to accomplish, STI/HIV care, surveillance, and prevention may be improved by developing consensus on core questions to be used in sexual histories.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)370-376
Number of pages7
JournalSexually Transmitted Diseases
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005

Fingerprint

Sexually Transmitted Diseases
HIV
Condoms
Sexual Behavior
Risk Reduction Behavior
Surveys and Questionnaires
Contraception
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Counseling
Consensus
Public Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

A national survey of clinic sexual histories for sexually transmitted infection and HIV screening. / Kurth, Ann E.; Holmes, King K.; Hawkins, Renee; Golden, Matthew R.

In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Vol. 32, No. 6, 06.2005, p. 370-376.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kurth, Ann E. ; Holmes, King K. ; Hawkins, Renee ; Golden, Matthew R. / A national survey of clinic sexual histories for sexually transmitted infection and HIV screening. In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases. 2005 ; Vol. 32, No. 6. pp. 370-376.
@article{134dd7c926864fbebe9635e9804ba258,
title = "A national survey of clinic sexual histories for sexually transmitted infection and HIV screening",
abstract = "Background: Optimal elements of a sexual history for sexually transmitted infection (STI) and HIV risk assessment remain undefined. Goal: The goal of this study was to describe sexual histories in use at STI clinics across the United States. Study: This study consisted of a cross-sectional survey of facilities in cities with populations > 200,000 (n = 65). Within each city, a public health STI clinic (71{\%} of the sample) or other STI care facility (29{\%}) was randomly selected and sexual history forms were requested. Information was obtained from 48 clinics (74{\%} response). Results: Most forms recorded information on symptoms and prior STI (96{\%}), condom use (88{\%}), other contraception (85{\%}), and numbers and gender (83{\%}) of sex partners. Common HIV risk questions were injecting drug use (IDU; 94{\%}), sex for drugs or money (58{\%}), and sex with an HIV-positive or IDU partner (52{\%}). Ascertainment of time during which risks occurred (contact periods) varied from the past 14 days to the past 12 months, with only 38{\%} of clinics using any 1 time period. Few histories (17{\%}) incorporated questions for men who have sex with men (MSM). Only 2 (4{\%}) had space to record Information about sexual behaviors by the HIV status of the sex partner. Condom use was infrequently assessed specifically for vaginal and anal sex (13{\%}), and condom use problems were rarely explored (10{\%}). Most forms documented STI/HIV counseling, although few (25{\%}) included specific risk reduction plans. Conclusions: Sexual histories are highly variable. Although challenging to accomplish, STI/HIV care, surveillance, and prevention may be improved by developing consensus on core questions to be used in sexual histories.",
author = "Kurth, {Ann E.} and Holmes, {King K.} and Renee Hawkins and Golden, {Matthew R.}",
year = "2005",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1097/01.olq.0000154499.17511.0a",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "370--376",
journal = "Sexually Transmitted Diseases",
issn = "0148-5717",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A national survey of clinic sexual histories for sexually transmitted infection and HIV screening

AU - Kurth, Ann E.

AU - Holmes, King K.

AU - Hawkins, Renee

AU - Golden, Matthew R.

PY - 2005/6

Y1 - 2005/6

N2 - Background: Optimal elements of a sexual history for sexually transmitted infection (STI) and HIV risk assessment remain undefined. Goal: The goal of this study was to describe sexual histories in use at STI clinics across the United States. Study: This study consisted of a cross-sectional survey of facilities in cities with populations > 200,000 (n = 65). Within each city, a public health STI clinic (71% of the sample) or other STI care facility (29%) was randomly selected and sexual history forms were requested. Information was obtained from 48 clinics (74% response). Results: Most forms recorded information on symptoms and prior STI (96%), condom use (88%), other contraception (85%), and numbers and gender (83%) of sex partners. Common HIV risk questions were injecting drug use (IDU; 94%), sex for drugs or money (58%), and sex with an HIV-positive or IDU partner (52%). Ascertainment of time during which risks occurred (contact periods) varied from the past 14 days to the past 12 months, with only 38% of clinics using any 1 time period. Few histories (17%) incorporated questions for men who have sex with men (MSM). Only 2 (4%) had space to record Information about sexual behaviors by the HIV status of the sex partner. Condom use was infrequently assessed specifically for vaginal and anal sex (13%), and condom use problems were rarely explored (10%). Most forms documented STI/HIV counseling, although few (25%) included specific risk reduction plans. Conclusions: Sexual histories are highly variable. Although challenging to accomplish, STI/HIV care, surveillance, and prevention may be improved by developing consensus on core questions to be used in sexual histories.

AB - Background: Optimal elements of a sexual history for sexually transmitted infection (STI) and HIV risk assessment remain undefined. Goal: The goal of this study was to describe sexual histories in use at STI clinics across the United States. Study: This study consisted of a cross-sectional survey of facilities in cities with populations > 200,000 (n = 65). Within each city, a public health STI clinic (71% of the sample) or other STI care facility (29%) was randomly selected and sexual history forms were requested. Information was obtained from 48 clinics (74% response). Results: Most forms recorded information on symptoms and prior STI (96%), condom use (88%), other contraception (85%), and numbers and gender (83%) of sex partners. Common HIV risk questions were injecting drug use (IDU; 94%), sex for drugs or money (58%), and sex with an HIV-positive or IDU partner (52%). Ascertainment of time during which risks occurred (contact periods) varied from the past 14 days to the past 12 months, with only 38% of clinics using any 1 time period. Few histories (17%) incorporated questions for men who have sex with men (MSM). Only 2 (4%) had space to record Information about sexual behaviors by the HIV status of the sex partner. Condom use was infrequently assessed specifically for vaginal and anal sex (13%), and condom use problems were rarely explored (10%). Most forms documented STI/HIV counseling, although few (25%) included specific risk reduction plans. Conclusions: Sexual histories are highly variable. Although challenging to accomplish, STI/HIV care, surveillance, and prevention may be improved by developing consensus on core questions to be used in sexual histories.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=19444366099&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=19444366099&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/01.olq.0000154499.17511.0a

DO - 10.1097/01.olq.0000154499.17511.0a

M3 - Article

VL - 32

SP - 370

EP - 376

JO - Sexually Transmitted Diseases

JF - Sexually Transmitted Diseases

SN - 0148-5717

IS - 6

ER -