A motion aftereffect from still photographs depicting motion: Research article

Jonathan Winawer, Alexander C. Huk, Lera Boroditsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A photograph of an action can convey a vivid sense of motion. Does the inference of motion from viewing a photograph involve the same neural and psychological representations used when one views physical motion? In this study, we tested whether implied motion is represented by the same direction-selective signals involved in the perception of real motion. We made use of the motion aftereffect, a visual motion illusion. Three experiments showed that viewing a series of static photographs with implied motion in a particular direction produced motion aftereffects in the opposite direction, as assessed with real-motion test probes. The transfer of adaptation from motion depicted in photographs to real motion demonstrates that the perception of implied motion activates direction-selective circuits that are also involved in processing real motion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)276-283
Number of pages8
JournalPsychological Science
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Research
Motion Perception
Psychology
Direction compound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

A motion aftereffect from still photographs depicting motion : Research article. / Winawer, Jonathan; Huk, Alexander C.; Boroditsky, Lera.

In: Psychological Science, Vol. 19, No. 3, 2008, p. 276-283.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Winawer, Jonathan ; Huk, Alexander C. ; Boroditsky, Lera. / A motion aftereffect from still photographs depicting motion : Research article. In: Psychological Science. 2008 ; Vol. 19, No. 3. pp. 276-283.
@article{b0ddbfca780f4628810ddd67c78a9fee,
title = "A motion aftereffect from still photographs depicting motion: Research article",
abstract = "A photograph of an action can convey a vivid sense of motion. Does the inference of motion from viewing a photograph involve the same neural and psychological representations used when one views physical motion? In this study, we tested whether implied motion is represented by the same direction-selective signals involved in the perception of real motion. We made use of the motion aftereffect, a visual motion illusion. Three experiments showed that viewing a series of static photographs with implied motion in a particular direction produced motion aftereffects in the opposite direction, as assessed with real-motion test probes. The transfer of adaptation from motion depicted in photographs to real motion demonstrates that the perception of implied motion activates direction-selective circuits that are also involved in processing real motion.",
author = "Jonathan Winawer and Huk, {Alexander C.} and Lera Boroditsky",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02080.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "276--283",
journal = "Psychological Science",
issn = "0956-7976",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A motion aftereffect from still photographs depicting motion

T2 - Research article

AU - Winawer, Jonathan

AU - Huk, Alexander C.

AU - Boroditsky, Lera

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - A photograph of an action can convey a vivid sense of motion. Does the inference of motion from viewing a photograph involve the same neural and psychological representations used when one views physical motion? In this study, we tested whether implied motion is represented by the same direction-selective signals involved in the perception of real motion. We made use of the motion aftereffect, a visual motion illusion. Three experiments showed that viewing a series of static photographs with implied motion in a particular direction produced motion aftereffects in the opposite direction, as assessed with real-motion test probes. The transfer of adaptation from motion depicted in photographs to real motion demonstrates that the perception of implied motion activates direction-selective circuits that are also involved in processing real motion.

AB - A photograph of an action can convey a vivid sense of motion. Does the inference of motion from viewing a photograph involve the same neural and psychological representations used when one views physical motion? In this study, we tested whether implied motion is represented by the same direction-selective signals involved in the perception of real motion. We made use of the motion aftereffect, a visual motion illusion. Three experiments showed that viewing a series of static photographs with implied motion in a particular direction produced motion aftereffects in the opposite direction, as assessed with real-motion test probes. The transfer of adaptation from motion depicted in photographs to real motion demonstrates that the perception of implied motion activates direction-selective circuits that are also involved in processing real motion.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84930384813&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84930384813&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02080.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02080.x

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84930384813

VL - 19

SP - 276

EP - 283

JO - Psychological Science

JF - Psychological Science

SN - 0956-7976

IS - 3

ER -